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Inside WFU

Wake Forest news for faculty and staff

History

Proposals funded in CNS, CSC, HES, HST, and PHY

Clarke

Clarke

Congratulations to Philip Clarke, assistant professor of counseling, whose proposal entitled “Care Train Project” has been funded by the Wake Forest University Health Sciences.

Hellyer

Hellyer

Congratulations to Robert Hellyer, associate professor of history, whose proposal entitled “The Civil Wars of Japan’s Meiji Restoration and National Reconciliation Global Historical Perspectives” has been funded by the Japan Foundation.

Kim-Shapiro

Kim-Shapiro

Congratulations to Daniel B. Kim-Shapiro, professor physics, whose proposal entitled “Antidote for inhaled CO poisoning based on mutationally engineered neuroglobin” has been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under award number 1R01HL125886-01 and by [subaward/subcontract from] University of Pittsburgh (WFU funding agency).

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Historian Ed Hendricks was part of Wake Forest history

20090512.hendricks.495x260By Kerry King, Wake Forest Magazine

Much of J. Edwin Hendricks’ life story can be gleaned from the last four digits of his home telephone number: 1834.

It seems fitting that those four numbers – the year of Wake Forest’s founding – belonged to a historian who loved Wake Forest’s history and who was one of the longest serving professors in the University’s history.

Hendricks, who retired in 2009, died March 27 in Winston-Salem. He was 79.

“He was one of the most gentle, intelligent, considerate people I have ever known,” said Chris Hendricks, one of his three children. “He loved his students and Wake Forest.”

Hendricks’ 48 years on the faculty was second only to psychology professor Bob Beck, who retired the same year. “Over the years, I was frequently asked what I teach at Wake Forest,” Hendricks said in an interview when he retired. “I regret that I resisted the temptation to respond, ‘Why, I teach Wake Forest students.’ They were always what the process was all about.”

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Professor Emeritus of History Ed Hendricks dies

20090512.hendricks.495x260We are saddened to report that J. Edwin “Ed” Hendricks, professor emeritus of history, died March 27 in Winston-Salem.

Dr. Hendricks accepted his first and only faculty appointment as an Early American specialist at Wake Forest College in 1961. He retired in 2009.

We grieve Dr. Hendricks’ death and extend our condolences to his family and friends, as well as those at Wake Forest who had the opportunity to know him. A service celebrating his life will be held April 4 at 2 p.m. at College Park Baptist Church, 1701 Polo Road, Winston-Salem, with a reception to follow in Smith Hall at the church. Memorial gifts may be made to the J. Edwin Hendricks Scholarship Fund in care of the Deacon Club, 499 Deacon Blvd., Winston-Salem, NC 27105.

Wake Forest offers support and counseling services for all students, faculty and staff. The Counseling Center may be reached at 758-5273, the Chaplain’s Office at 758-5210. For faculty and staff, there is also the Employee Assistance Program at 716-5493.

A message from Wake Forest’s new Dean of the College

michele.gillespie.300x175A message to faculty and staff from Wake Forest’s new Dean of the College Michele Gillespie

Dear Colleagues,

By now, the news has been shared that I will be taking on a new role at Wake Forest. It is a privilege to be selected as the next dean of the College.

I am eager to support the faculty in our pursuit of the teacher-scholar ideal and to support the staff in their commitment to our community.

I think we all embrace what is timeless and true about our liberal arts tradition—the quest for knowledge, the open exchange of ideas, independent thought, appreciation for diversity and difference, and commitment to the collective good. Such an education nurtures exploration, imagination and creativity—indispensable qualities in our increasingly complex 21st century world.

Wake Forest is a special place. We are a community of passionate educators, gifted researchers and talented staff. We pursue academic excellence. We cherish our community. We embrace Pro Humanitate.

I am grateful for this new opportunity, and I look forward to working together with those faculty and staff who have been with Wake Forest for many years and those who are newer to our community in pursuit of academic excellence and the education of the whole person.

WFU hosts first of three conferences on Meiji Restoration

meiji.300x175

On January 30-31, Wake Forest University hosted “The Civil Wars of Japan’s Meiji Restoration & National Reconciliation: Global Historical Perspectives” the initial conference in a multiyear, tri-continental (North America, Europe and Asia) project to facilitate international and interdisciplinary discussions in advance of the 150-year commemoration of Japan’s Meiji Restoration.

The 1868 Meiji Restoration was a crucial moment in Japanese and modern world history. The samurai-dominated feudal regime was overthrown, and the new regime, advocating adoption of Western models, quickly revamped political, economic, military, religious, and social structures, transforming 250 semi-autonomous feudal fiefs into a unified nation-state. Within a few decades, Japan rivaled Western nations in military and economic prowess.

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December 2014 faculty publications

Coates

Coates

Hall

Hall

Shapiro

Shapiro

Still

Still

 

 

 

 

Coates, David. (Politics & International Affairs). America in the Shadow of Empire. Palgrave Macmillan. December 2014.

Allhoff, Fritz, & Mark Hall. (Law). The Affordable Care Act Decision: Philosphical and Legal Implications. Routledge. February 2014.

Holdridge, Jefferson. (English). Devil’s Den and Other Poems. Split Oak Press. December 2014.

Jung, Kevin. (Divinity). Christian Ethics and Commonsense Morality: An Intuitionist Account. Routledge. November 2014.

Kondepudi, Dilip, & Ilya Prigogine. (Physics). Modern Thermodynamics: From Heat Engines to Dissipative Structures, 2nd ed. Wiley. December 2014.

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25 Years Later: President Hatch’s Book on American Christianity

Christianity-Democratization-headerA quarter century after it was published, scholars are still talking about the award-winning book, “The Democratization of American Christianity,” written by Wake Forest University President Nathan O. Hatch.

To mark the book’s 25th anniversary, Wake Forest will host a half-day symposium Feb. 6 featuring seven of the country’s most distinguished scholars of early American religion reflecting on the influence of the book.

The event will run from noon to 4:30 p.m. in Farrell Hall’s Broyhill Auditorium and is free and open to the public. Registration is not required. A detailed schedule is posted on the symposium website.

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Rue establishes Police Accountability Task Force

To support and advance Wake Forest’s commitment to creating a safe and inclusive environment for every member of the campus community, Vice President for Campus Life Penny Rue has established the Police Accountability Task Force.

The Task Force, which includes faculty, student and alumni representatives, is charged with overseeing the implementation of recommendations related to University Police made in a report by independent consultants following a review in Spring 2014 of concerns regarding racial bias.

In addition, the Task Force will work to identify other initiatives related to University Police that could contribute to a safe and inclusive environment.

“In our ongoing work to build community, the formation of this group is an important step,” said Rue.

Professor of Law Kami Simmons has been named chair of the Task Force.

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September 2014 faculty milestones

See a list of faculty milestones for September 2014:

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Professor Emeritus of History Richard Zuber dies

richard.zuber.200x150By Kerry King (’85) Wake Forest Magazine

Richard L. Zuber (P ’82, ’89) may have been as well known for playing good ol’ mountain music as he was for teaching United States and American military history. He did both well enough to become a regular in the alumni/faculty bluegrass band at Homecoming every year and to teach at Wake Forest for 38 years.

Zuber, who retired in 2000, died on Sept. 15, 2014, in Winston-Salem. He was 82. A service and reception will be held at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Winston-Salem at 2 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 22.

He is survived by his children, Jonathan (’82) and Elizabeth (’89), and his former wife, Isabelle Zuber; and his longtime companion, Mary Bartholomew, and her daughter and son-in-law, Sallie (’91) and Robert Capizzi (’94, MBA ’01), and two grandchildren.

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