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Inside WFU

Wake Forest news for faculty and staff

Health and Exercise Science

Wake Forest’s weight management program offered in January

This is a guest post from the Health and Exercise Science Department:

weight-management-imageUnlike the Therapeutic Lifestyle Change (TLC) program, also being offered in January, our six-month weight management program will go beyond healthy lifestyle modification, with a laser focus on weight loss. This program will offer a combination of weight loss strategies and techniques to help individuals reach their goals.

Applications are now being accepted for participation in our group starting in January. Initial assessments and testing will began in December and will be performed prior to the start of our first weekly session. Weekly group sessions will be held here on campus in Worrell Professional Center, Room 1162 on Thursdays from 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. starting on Thursday, Jan. 26.

Here are few highlights of the weight management program:

–Six months of weekly group sessions
–Geared specifically for weight loss
–Initial & six-month assessments
–Initial & six-month DEXA total body composition scans
–Formal assessment and follow-up with a dietitian
–Weekly food diary evaluations and feedback
–Physical activity tracking & exercise guidance
–Specific quality nutrient guidelines
–Behavior modification & mindfulness

This program is designed for participants who meet the following criteria:

–Individuals with weight loss needs (BMI >25)
–Able to attend weekly sessions held on Thursdays at 11:30 am
–Able to commit to personal dietary and exercise changes
–Full-time, permanent WFU Employee

If you are interested in participating or have questions, please contact Andrea Cox at shuttar@nullwfu.edu or at 336-758-5853 for more information. Space is limited.

Wake Forest’s TLC program offered in January

This is a guest post from the Health and Exercise Science Department:

therapeutic-lifestyle-imageAre you looking to live a more healthy and active lifestyle? If so, TLC is for you!

Unlike our Weight Management Program (also being offered in January), TLC is not a weight loss program. TLC is designed to develop a healthy and active lifestyle utilizing exercise and education programs. Weekly meetings are held to develop behavioral strategies for the management of physical activity and healthy eating. TLC is a three-month program that will meet on Mondays from 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. here on campus in Worrell Professional Center, Room 1162.

Here are few highlights of the Therapeutic Lifestyle Change program:

–Three months of weekly group sessions
–Geared toward healthy lifestyle modifications (not weight loss)
–Initial & three-month assessments
–Formal assessment and follow-up with a dietitian
–Weekly food diary evaluations and feedback
–Physical activity tracking & exercise guidance
–Behavior modification & mindfulness

This program is designed for participants who meet the following criteria:

–Anyone wanting to live a healthy more active lifestyle
–Able to attend weekly sessions held on Mondays at 11:30 a.m.
–Able to commit to personal dietary and exercise changes as needed
–Permanent WFU Employee

If you would like to participate in the Therapeutic Lifestyle Change program, please contact Andrea Cox at shuttar@nullwfu.edu or 336-758-5853 for more information or to sign-up. Space is limited.

Proposals funded: Lachgar, Mihalko, Silman, Williams

Congratulations to Abdessadek Lachgar, professor of chemistry, whose proposal entitled “Empowering Pakistani Women through Scientific Research, Technology Development, and Entrepreneurship: Waste-to-Energy Technology Development” has been funded by the USAID and by [subaward/subcontract from] National Academy of Sciences (WFU funding agency).

 

Congratulations to Shannon Mihalko, associate professor of health and exercise science, whose proposal entitled “Understanding and Predicting Fatigue, CV Decline and Events After Breast Cancer Treatment” has been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and by [subaward/subcontract from] Wake Forest University Health Sciences (WFU funding agency).

 

Congratulations to Miles Silman, professor of biology, whose proposal entitled “FESD Type 1: The Dynamics of Mountains, Landscape, and Climate in the Distribution and Generation of Biodiversity in the Amazon/Andean Forest” has been funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and by [subaward/subcontract from] Duke University (WFU funding agency).

 

Congratulations to Richard T. Williams, professor of physics, whose proposal entitled “Collaborative Research: ARI-MA: Realizing High Performance Inorganic Scintillators at Low Cost” has been funded by the US Department of Homeland Security.

Staff recognized for milestones, Employees of the Year announced

This is a guest post from Human Resources:

Members of the campus community honored service milestones of more than 250 Wake Forest staff members who were celebrating approximately 2,800 combined years of service. These individuals were recognized at the 16th annual Staff Rewards & Recognition on Tuesday, October 11 at Bridger Field House. Later in the day, a campus-wide reception was open to all faculty and staff in the Green Room of Reynolda Hall.

Staff members celebrating 30 or more years of service included:

  • 30 years: Cathy Chinlund (Advancement), Sherman Hart (Reynolda House), Gale Newport (Benson University Center), Beth Tedford (Z. Smith Reynolds Library)
  • 35 years: Janet Cromer (School of Law), Cindy Davis (Biology), Mike Ford (Campus Life), Dallas Nifong (Facilities & Campus Services)
  • 40 years: Michael Bottoms (University Police), Carrnell Covington (Facilities & Campus Services), Ann Knox (Parking & Transportation)
Wake Forest President Nathan O. Hatch presents staff member Betsy Chapman with the Employee of the Year plaque on Tuesday, October 11, 2016.

President Hatch presents staff member Betsy Chapman with the Employee of the Year plaque

Betsy Chapman, Director of Parent Giving, and Patty Kennedy, Administrative Assistant in the Department of Health and Exercise Science, were also recognized as Employees of the Year. They were nominated by faculty and staff for their contributions in the areas of innovation, integrity, accountability, inclusion, and Pro Humanitate.

Chapman was honored for mentoring students and helping parents feel part of the Wake Forest experience. The Daily Deac blog she authors was cited throughout her award nomination as a highly effective way to connect parents with the campus community. As the nomination reads, “Betsy is a valuable asset to Wake Forest, and her professionalism and genuine love for the university and its students should be commended!”

Wake Forest President Nathan O. Hatch presents staff member Patty Kennedy with the Employee of the Year plaque on Tuesday, October 11, 2016.

President Hatch presents staff member Patty Kennedy with the Employee of the Year plaque

Kennedy was recognized for embracing new ideas and serving as a positive role model for new staff members. The award nomination states, “Patty is always thinking of creative ways to deal with problems, with the goal of making positive changes for everyone. She is well aware of the need to serve both the department and the community.” Kennedy has demonstrated this community service through her work with the United Way and Arts Council.

Proposals funded: Beavers, Bonin, Carroll, Rejeski

IMG_6550

Beavers

Congratulations to Kristen Beavers, assistant professor of health and exercise science, whose proposal entitled “MediFast for Seniors Study” has been funded by (a private sponsor).

 

 

Keith Bonin

Bonin

Congratulations to Keith Bonin, professor of physics, whose proposal entitled “Predicting therapy-induced leukemia in breast cancer patients [Cayuse 16-0040]” has been funded by the Wake Forest University Health Sciences.

 

 

David Carroll

Carroll

Congratulations for David Carroll, professor of physics, whose proposal entitled “Sustainable Water Purification” has been funded by the NASA and by [subaward/subcontract from] Streamline Automation (WFU funding agency).

 

 

Jack Rejeski

Rejeski

Congratulations to Jack Rejeski, professor of health and exercise science, whose proposal entitled “Cooperative Lifestyle Intervention Program in Knee Osteoarthritis Patients (CLIP-OA)” has been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under award number 1R01AG050725-01A1 and by [subaward/subcontract from] Ohio State University (WFU funding agency).

 

 

Brubaker appointed faculty athletics representative

Photos from the Wake Forest HELPS program, at the Health and Exercise Science clinical research facility, on Monday, March 16, 2015. HES professor Peter Brubaker runs the program.

Peter Brubaker, professor of Health and Exercise Science, has been named Faculty Athletics Representative of Wake Forest University.

President Nathan O. Hatch appointed Brubaker to a three-year term to provide a faculty viewpoint in the administration of intercollegiate athletic programs. He succeeds math professor Richard Carmichael who has held the position since 2003.

“We’ve had very strong Faculty Athletics Representatives in the past and Pete will continue this tradition,” Hatch said. “Pete exemplifies what you want in this position. He’s a great teacher, a great researcher and a strong administrator. He has great understanding of varsity athletes and for all those reasons, he will make a great representative for Wake Forest.”

As the Faculty Athletics Representative (FAR), Brubaker will act on behalf of the president and report to him, representing athletics to faculty and faculty to athletics to ensure the appropriate balance between academics and intercollegiate athletics. Major areas of responsibility include academic oversight, student-athlete welfare, compliance and representing Wake Forest at meetings of the NCAA and ACC which mandate the position.

Brubaker, who has taught at Wake Forest for 25 years, said the appointment is an honor. “I know it’s an important role, and I’m totally committed to working closely with the administration, faculty and athletics department to help protect the well established integrity and outstanding academic performance of our student athlete,” he said.

Having hundreds of student athletes come through his classrooms over the years, coupled with his personal experience of being the father of a collegiate athlete at Wake Forest, he said, has given him an appreciation and understanding of what college athletes face.

“I know first hand the challenges of maintaining a healthy academic and athletic balance in college. I’m generally impressed with how well Wake Forest athletes are able do this,” he said.

Brubaker also serves as the HES department’s graduate program director. He is well-regarded for his research and clinical experience in the area of exercise physiology and cardiovascular disease prevention/rehabilitation.

Aging Re-Imagined symposium begins March 17

The symposium “Aging Re-Imagined” brings leading scholars, artists, medical professionals and researchers together at Wake Forest who will share insights on four key ideas that inform how we age, and how we think and feel about aging: Mobility, Mind (including memory), Mortality, and Meaning.

The symposium begins March 17 at 4 p.m. with a presentation by and Q&A with Liz Lerman, a famed choreographer known for her work with multi-generational ensembles to dispel the idea that dance is only for youth.

Following the keynote by Jay Olshansky at 6 p.m., the aging symposium resumes on March 18 at Bridger Field House with a full schedule of speakers and presentations. More information can be found here.

“Aging Re-Imagined” came about because of associate professor of dance Christina Soriano and her work teaching dance to people living with Parkinson’s Disease. As a member of Wake Forest’s Translational Science Center (TSC), she is one of many faculty from the biochemical, physiological, psychological, behavioral disciplines and the arts whose goal is to improve functional health in aging through research and academic training programs. Continue reading »

HES Department settles into new home at Worrell Center

A Wake Forest student walks past the new Health and Exercise Science addition to Worrell Professional Center on Tuesday, February 23, 2016. The addition has research labs and classrooms.

The Health and Exercise Science (HES) Department has more room to stretch and grow, thanks to a new addition to the Worrell Professional Center.

The 29,000-square-foot addition, which opened this semester, houses state-of-the-art research space, classrooms, and academic and administrative offices. The facility includes a two-story entry into the HES suite at the ground floor alongside Carroll Weathers Drive, making it easily accessible for students, faculty, staff and visitors.

HES department chair Michael Berry said faculty input into the building’s design was integral in developing the collaborative space.

“Functionality was the key,” Berry said. “We didn’t gain that much square footage, but the layout and design is making all the difference which is fantastic for our department in all respects.”

The functional aspects include four dedicated classrooms and modern lab spaces for the 150 HES majors and 18 graduate students. Students also now have a lounge and comfortable living room-style spaces perfect for studying or socializing. The faculty who lead research teams – many of which are nationally renowned – also have dedicated lab space whereas before labs were shared between teaching and scholarship. Though the flow of the building is separate from the law school, the HES wing is connected to the existing Worrell building through an interior hallway. Continue reading »

Application period open for Move More program

Move more Move OftenSpring semester applications are being accepted through Feb. 12 for the wellbeing project called Move More. Move Often.

The project, which is a research program (IRB# IRB00022164), is open to students, faculty and staff.

To apply, visit move.thrive.wfu.edu.

It is designed as an eight-week step challenge to encourage individuals to increase their daily physical activity. Using Fitbit activity trackers, participants can monitor their daily steps and activity. Throughout the eight-week challenge, participants can access performance incentives, receive supplemental resources and materials, as well as discounts.

Participants will be required to attend a one-hour orientation session. A Fitbit will be provided to participants. Participants may also use their own Fitbit, instead.

At the conclusion of the challenge, prizes will be awarded on an individual basis for significant improvement in the number of average daily steps. Following each challenge, participants will have the opportunity to re-enroll for additional challenges to keep improving their daily physical activity and potentially win more prizes.

The website offers additional information about Move More. Move Often. The site includes a list of resources and an FAQ section, for instance.

This project is co-sponsored by Office of Wellbeing, Campus Life, Health and Exercise Science, Environmental Health and Safety, Hospitality & Auxiliary Services, Residence Life and Housing, Information Technology, PDC Run, Forest, Run (Walk Forest), Therapeutic Lifestyle Change, Aramark, Campus Recreation.

New wellbeing project launched

A new wellbeing project is open to students, faculty and staff.  It is called Move More. Move Often.  This is a research program (IRB# IRB00022164)

To apply, visit move.thrive.wfu.edu.  Application period will continue through Oct. 6.

It is designed as an eight-week step challenge to encourage individuals to increase their daily physical activity.  Using Fitbit activity trackers, participants can monitor their daily steps and activity.  Throughout the eight-week challenge, participants can access performance incentives, receive supplemental resources and materials, as well as discounts.

Participants will be required to attend a one-hour orientation session.   A Fitbit will be provided to participants.  Participants may also use their own Fitbit, instead.

Continue reading »