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Wake Forest news for faculty and staff

Health and Exercise Science

Application period open for Move More program

Move more Move OftenSpring semester applications are being accepted through Feb. 12 for the wellbeing project called Move More. Move Often.

The project, which is a research program (IRB# IRB00022164), is open to students, faculty and staff.

To apply, visit move.thrive.wfu.edu.

It is designed as an eight-week step challenge to encourage individuals to increase their daily physical activity. Using Fitbit activity trackers, participants can monitor their daily steps and activity. Throughout the eight-week challenge, participants can access performance incentives, receive supplemental resources and materials, as well as discounts.

Participants will be required to attend a one-hour orientation session. A Fitbit will be provided to participants. Participants may also use their own Fitbit, instead.

At the conclusion of the challenge, prizes will be awarded on an individual basis for significant improvement in the number of average daily steps. Following each challenge, participants will have the opportunity to re-enroll for additional challenges to keep improving their daily physical activity and potentially win more prizes.

The website offers additional information about Move More. Move Often. The site includes a list of resources and an FAQ section, for instance.

This project is co-sponsored by Office of Wellbeing, Campus Life, Health and Exercise Science, Environmental Health and Safety, Hospitality & Auxiliary Services, Residence Life and Housing, Information Technology, PDC Run, Forest, Run (Walk Forest), Therapeutic Lifestyle Change, Aramark, Campus Recreation.

New wellbeing project launched

A new wellbeing project is open to students, faculty and staff.  It is called Move More. Move Often.  This is a research program (IRB# IRB00022164)

To apply, visit move.thrive.wfu.edu.  Application period will continue through Oct. 6.

It is designed as an eight-week step challenge to encourage individuals to increase their daily physical activity.  Using Fitbit activity trackers, participants can monitor their daily steps and activity.  Throughout the eight-week challenge, participants can access performance incentives, receive supplemental resources and materials, as well as discounts.

Participants will be required to attend a one-hour orientation session.   A Fitbit will be provided to participants.  Participants may also use their own Fitbit, instead.

Continue reading »

Messier receives $6 million research grant

A $6 million federal grant, the largest ever awarded to Wake Forest, will enable health and exercise science researchers to further study knee osteoarthritis and successful treatment measures in community-based settings.

Wake Forest Heath and Exercise Science faculty involved in the IDEA study, Steve Messier (in white), Gary Miller, and Shannon Mihalko, in the Biomechanics laboratory in Reynolds Gym on Tuesday, September 24, 2013.

Wake Forest Heath and Exercise Science faculty involved in the IDEA study, Steve Messier (in white), Gary Miller, and Shannon Mihalko, in the Biomechanics laboratory in Reynolds Gym on Tuesday, September 24, 2013.

Health and exercise science professor Steve Messier and colleagues have spent 26 of the last 34 years at Wake Forest studying the effects of exercise and dietary restriction related to knee osteoarthritis (OA) through clinical trials research. This new grant will fund a study known as WE-CAN – Weight Loss and Exercise for Communities with Arthritis in North Carolina – that will put these years of highly-controlled clinical study results to the test in a real-world setting.

“Knee osteoarthritis is a leading cause of disability in older adults and there are over 250 million people in the world affected,” Messier said. “Our work has looked at effects of walking, strength training and weight loss on function and pain in OA under very controlled settings. We’ve decided to take what we’ve learned before and move it out in the community.”

Armed with the grant from the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), Messier and his team, which includes professor Gary Miller, a nutrition expert, and associate professor and health psychologist Shannon Mihalko, both of the Health and Exercise Science department, are conducting what’s known as a pragmatic clinical trial in which there are very few controls in order to simulate normal clinical conditions.

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Barbee Oakes named University’s first chief diversity officer

Dr. Barbee Oakes, Director, Wake Forest Office of Multicultural Affairs.

Barbee Oakes, chief diversity officer

Barbee Oakes, one of the most recognized leaders in Wake Forest diversity and inclusion initiatives, has been promoted to a new position expanding her opportunities to advance those efforts.

Recently, Oakes was appointed as Wake Forest’s first chief diversity officer. She retains her assistant provost title and responsibilities, developed over her six years in that role.

“As our first chief diversity officer, Barbee is beautifully positioned to advance strategic planning and execution of Wake Forest’s diversity and inclusion initiatives,” said Provost Rogan Kersh. “She will confer regularly with the president’s cabinet, deans, governance boards and the larger campus community on issues involving the University’s progress on inclusive excellence initiatives.”

Oakes has her sights set on several high-priority goals for this year and beyond.

“Continuing to proactively address campus climate issues remains a very high University priority this year,” Oakes said. “With increased diversity, the challenges we face in establishing policies, programs and practices to ensure everyone feels included become more complex and nuanced.”

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Proposals funded: Messier, Mitra, Thonhauser

Stephen Messier

Messier

Congratulations to Steve Messier, professor of health and exercise science, whose proposal entitled “Pain Management in Osteoarthritis: Clinical Benefits and Cost Effectiveness” has been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and by [subaward/subcontract from] Brigham and Women’s Hospital (WFU funding agency).

 

Ananda Mitra

Mitra

 

Congratulations to Ananda Mitra, professor of communication, whose proposal entitled “Hospice needs Assessment” has been funded by the Hospice of the Piedmont.

 

 

Timo Thonhauser

Thonhauser

Congratulations to Timo Thonhauser, associate professor of physics, whose proposal entitled “Kinetics and Reactivity in Metal Organic Framework Materials” has been funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and by [subaward/subcontract from] University of Texas-Dallas (WFU funding agency).

Leo Ellison, professor emeritus of health & exercise science, dies

5510d3da8e97c.imageWe are saddened to report that Leo Ellison, associate professor emeritus of health and exercise science, died March 21 in Winston-Salem.

Professor Ellison joined the Wake Forest faculty in 1957 and retired in 1999.

We grieve Professor Ellison’s death and extend our condolences to his family and friends, as well as those at Wake Forest who had the opportunity to know him.

A service celebrating his life will be held March 28 at 2 p.m. at Wait Chapel. Additional details are available in an obituary in the Winston-Salem Journal.

Wake Forest offers support and counseling services for all students, faculty and staff.  The Counseling Center may be reached at 758-5273, the Chaplain’s Office at 758-5210. For faculty and staff, there is also the Employee Assistance Program at 716-5493.

BCBSNC seed grants support health, wellness research across campus

Wake Forest University’s associate provost of research has announced the faculty recipients of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina (BCBSNC) seed grants to support research on health and wellbeing.

“The research being supported with these grants has sustainability potential and will have a great impact on many people’s lives,” said Bruce King, associate provost of research at the university.

Last year, BCBSNC partnered with Wake Forest University to create a model for health and wellbeing that included seed money for faculty research in these areas. Four grants, for $50,000 each, were awarded to Mark Jensen, School of Divinity; Mark Hall, School of Law; Jeff Katula, Health and Exercise Science; and Christine Soriano, Theater and Dance.

Additionally, the initial BCBSNC gift supports the transformation of Reynolds Gym into a comprehensive center for wellbeing, has funded a new director of wellbeing position and will support Wake Forest’s approach to wellbeing across eight dimensions – physical, emotional, spiritual, social, intellectual, financial, occupational, and environmental – under the Thrive umbrella.

The seed money will support the following research projects:

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Proposals funded: Beavers, Carroll, Marsh

IMG_6550

Beavers

Congratulations to Kristen Beavers, assistant professor of health and exercise science, whose proposal entitled “Pepper Center Research Career Development Core Award: Effects of Exercise Modality During Weight Loss on Bone Health in Older Adults” has been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and by [subaward/subcontract from] Wake Forest University Health Sciences (WFU funding agency).

David Carroll

Carroll

Congratulations to David Carroll, professor of physics, whose proposal entitled “Power Generating Coverings” has been funded by NASA and by {subaward/subcontract from] Streamline Automation (WFU funding agency).

Tony Marsh

Marsh

Congratulations to Anthony Marsh, professor of health and exercise science, whose proposal entitled “Physical Exercise to Prevent Disability Pilot Study – LIFE Field Center” has been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and by [subaward/subcontract from] Wake Forest University Health Sciences (WFU funding agency).

Proposals funded: Jurchescu, Katula and Williams

Jurchescu

Jurchescu

Jeff Katula

Katula

Williams

Williams

Congratulations to Oana Jurchescu, assistant professor of physics, whose proposal entitled “Infra Red(IR) Spectroscopy for Electronic Structure Determination of Future Electronic Devices” has been funded by the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Congratulations to Jeffrey Katula, associate professor of health and exercise science, whose proposal entitled “HELP PD II” has been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and by [subaward/subcontract from] Wake Forest University Health Sciences (WFU funding agency).

Congratulations to Richard Williams, professor physics, whose proposal entitled “Collaborative Research: ARI-MA: Realizing high performance inorganic scintillators at low cost” has been funded by US Department of Homeland Security.

Proposals funded: Jones, King, Nixon

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Jones

Congratulations to Eric Jones, assistant professor of anthropology, whose proposal entitled “A Settlement Ecology Analysis of the Ecological Factors Influencing the Spatial Distribution of Middle-Range Communities in the North Carolina Piedmont, AD 1000-1600” has been funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Bruce King

King

Congratulations to Bruce King, professor of chemistry, whose proposal entitled “New Reagents for Tracking Protein Oxidation in Cells by MS and Imaging Methods” has been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and by [subaward/subcontract from] Wake Forest University Health Sciences (WFU funding agency).

Pat Nixon

Nixon

Congratulations to Patricia Nixon, professor of health and exercise science, whose proposal entitled “Pre-natal Events, Post-natal Consequences II (Competitive Renewal)” has been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and by [subaward/subcontract from] Wake Forest University Health Sciences (WFU funding agency).