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Wake Forest news for faculty and staff

Campus Life

Message: In light of Charlotte, we are called together

Update to this post: Today’s service will be led from the Global Christian tradition.

This message was emailed Sept. 21 to students, faculty and staff on behalf of Vice President Penny Rue and Chaplain Tim Auman:

Dear Members of the Wake Forest Community,

The wave of national unrest between police officers and people of color landed close to home last night. The police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott led to protests that continued into the early morning hours and resulted in several injuries and property damage.

At Wake Forest, we know that we are a community in progress – certainly not perfect, but better when we come together. This afternoon we have an opportunity to come together for a time of prayer and reflection.

Called Together, a weekly prayer service sponsored by the Office of the Chaplain, is a time to gather and pray about the many issues and events that affect our community, nation and world. All members of the community are invited to join us today at 12 noon in Davis Chapel.

Sincerely,

Penny Rue, Vice President for Campus Life
Tim Auman, University Chaplain

Clifford named associate dean of students for student conduct

Matt Clifford, the Associate Dean of Students for Student Conduct, Wake Forest University, Tuesday, August 30, 2016.

Matt Clifford

Matt Clifford has been named Wake Forest’s associate dean of students for student conduct.

Clifford, who joined Wake Forest’s staff in 2010, previously was director of Residence Life and Housing and director of Campus Life Projects.

As associate dean, Clifford will be responsible for the administrative management of the student code of conduct and serve as the primary hearing officer for non-academic reports received by the Office of the Dean of Students.

“He will partner with students, faculty and staff to fulfill this responsibility and to design educational resources and programs that advance the standards of our community,” said Dean of Students Adam Goldstein.

Goldstein said he is “very excited” about Clifford joining his senior leadership team.

“He has the skills and experiences we need to strengthen our student conduct system in ways that support student learning and respect for our Honor Code,” Goldstein added.

Since joining Wake Forest, Goldstein said, Clifford has been a key figure in developing the Faculty Fellows program in Residence Life and Housing, the University’s Biased Incident Reporting System and the Division of Campus Life’s learning outcomes and assessment initiatives.

“He has a strong reputation among students as someone that cares about their experience, and among faculty and staff as a skilled professional and reliable partner,” Goldstein said.

Clifford received a doctorate in education from the University of North Florida, a master of education degree from the University of South Carolina and a bachelor of arts degree at Davidson College.

Previously, Clifford held a number of positions at Jacksonville University, including director of residential life, and worked at MIT.

Comings and Goings for July 2016

See a list of employees joining and leaving the University in July 2016:

Continue reading »

Wake Forest freshening up outdoor furniture, games

Three years after Wake Forest launched a program to promote more outdoor relaxation and fun on campus, the University is freshening up the program with new furniture, games and more.

When students return to campus this month, they will find the University has replaced all of the outdoor furniture installed in 2013, added more “giant” games, repaired the carts that store countless games, added new games to those carts, and more.

Back then, university administrators said they hoped to interrupt students’ regular routines a bit and get them to add a healthy measure of spontaneity and play to their campus activities.  In planning the program, Wake Forest consulted closely with Biederman Redevelopment Ventures Corp. a group with significant experience turning underused open spaces into areas for passers-by to stop and appreciate.

University staff say the program is a success and they want to keep it going with this fall semester’s improvements.

Part of this updating involves a deliberate effort to link the entire program more closely with Thrive, a comprehensive, campus-wide initiative to promote wellbeing among the entire campus community.  For instance, various carts and equipment will carry the popular Thrive logo.

Here’s what’s new for the fall semester:

–New furniture replaces the original furniture.
–Game carts are newly repaired and stocked with new games and sports equipment.
–Carts and equipment are branded with the Thrive logo.
–The giant chess and giant connect four games will be joined by giant Wake Forest Jenga and Demon Deacon corn hole. Giant games can be checked out by contacting Leigh Myers at myersl@nullwfu.edu.
–Students have been hired by Campus Life to play the outdoor piano during “high traffic” times on Hearn Plaza.

Helping Wake Forest with this program are 19 student employees who are part of Campus Life’s Event Resource Management (ERM) staff.  ERM staff are available seven days a week to assist with various activities on campus.

Greek Alumni Advisory Board established

In August 2015, the Office of Alumni Engagement and the Division of Campus Life brought together a diverse group of alumni representing various fraternity and sorority organizations to hear about what is happening in Greek life at Wake Forest and across the nation, and to talk about ways that the student experience here can be strengthened. Among the solutions proposed at that gathering was the creation of an advisory board relating to the fraternity and sorority experience at Wake Forest.

Now, the newly established Greek Alumni Advisory Board (GAAB) aims to serve as a bridge between alumni and the University in order to educate alumni about fraternity and sorority life today and to positively influence the student experience. The board also wants to support and strengthen the role of chapter advisors, as the University recognizes chapters with strong advisers tend to make better decisions.

The mission of the GAAB is: “Connecting yesterday’s and today’s Greeks to strengthen the spirit of Pro Humanitate.” Members include:

  • Alfred Adams (’68, JD ’73, P ’01), Winston-Salem, N.C., Sigma Chi
  • Lucy Anderson (’94, MBA ’99), Charlotte, N.C., Alpha Delta Pi
  • Martin Baker (’99), Winston-Salem, N.C., Kappa Alpha
  • Adrienne Myer Bohannon (’02), Seattle, Wash., Delta Delta Delta
  • Mike Ford (’72), Winston-Salem, N.C., Sigma Chi
  • Camille Wilkerson French* (’93), Lewisville, N.C., Delta Sigma Theta
  • Nate French (’93), Lewisville, N.C., Alpha Phi Alpha
  • Jane Claire Jacobi (’05), Charlotte, N.C., Delta Zeta
  • James Ivory (’85, P ’17), Seven Devils, N.C., Theta Chi
  • Gordon Kammire (’79, MD ’83, P ’18), Lexington, N.C., Kappa Sigma
  • Leslie Danese Kammire (’82, MD ’86, P ’18), Lexington, N.C., SOPH
  • Alicia Lee (’02), Houston, Tex., Kappa Alpha Theta
  • Molly Welles Lineberger* (’82, MA ’15, P ’15), Winston-Salem, N.C., Fideles
  • Shannon Bozoian Mihalko* (’92), Winston-Salem, N.C., Strings and Pi Beta Phi
  • Reid Nickle (’15), Washington, D.C., Kappa Alpha
  • Mike Queen (’68, P ’94), Wilmington, N.C., Lambda Chi Alpha
  • Jeff Richardson (’87), Newport, Ky., Delta Kappa Epsilon
  • Kim Boatwright Shirley (’85, P ’13, P ’13, P ’17), Raleigh, N.C., SOPH
  • Lisa Snodgrass (’95), Atlanta, Ga., Thymes and Kappa Alpha Theta
  • Andrew Snorton III (’93), Snellville, Ga., Alpha Phi Alpha
  • Rob Wall* (’98), Winston-Salem, N.C., Kappa Alpha
  • David M. Warren (’81, JD ’84, P ’13), Raleigh, N.C., Kappa Alpha
  • Bill Wells (’74), Winston-Salem, N.C., Sigma Chi
  • Tycely Williams* (’97), Alexandria, Va., Delta Delta Delta

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July 2016 staff milestones

See a list of staff milestones for July 2016: Continue reading »

2016-17 Wake Forest Fellows selected

A group photo of the new Wake Forest Fellows for the 2016-17 academic year, in front of Reynolda Hall on Wednesday, April 27, 2016.

Wake Forest Fellows for 2016-17

Twelve seniors will remain in the Wake Forest campus community following graduation in May as Wake Forest Fellows.  They will work in offices across campus, including the President’s Office, the Pro Humanitate Institute, the Z. Smith Reynolds Library and the Office of Personal and Career Development.

Since 2008, the Wake Forest Fellows program has provided exceptional Wake Forest college graduates with the opportunity to work in higher education administration for a year. Each fellow will serve as a full-time Wake Forest employee, starting this summer.  In addition to working with top administrators in a particular department, the fellows will participate in leadership activities and interact with faculty, staff and students to learn about the inner workings of higher education.

“We’re welcoming a class of Fellows that has excelled across the campus in academics, in service, and in leadership,” said Marybeth Wallace, special assistant to President Nathan O. Hatch.  “We can’t wait to feel all of that youthful energy in our offices.”
This group also represents the first time that fellowships have been arranged for Reynolda House Museum of American Art, the Pro Humanitate Institute and Wake Downtown: Biomedical Sciences and Engineering.

The Wake Forest Fellows for 2016-17 are:

  • Olivia Clark: Reynolda House (Ellicott City, Md.), History/minor, Italian
  • Kent Garrett: Information Systems (Noblesville, Ind.), Sociology/minors, Journalism and Entrepreneurship
  • Brian Hart: Dean of the College (Oxford, N.C), Politics and International Affairs
  • Millicent Hennessey: President’s Office (New York, N.Y.), Chinese Language and Culture
  • Sarah Hoyle: Personal and Career Development (Clemmons, N.C.), Politics and International Affairs
  • Kylie Kinder: START Gallery (Oak Park, Calif.), Art History and Psychology
  • Alexa King: Campus Life (Dallas, Texas), Psychology/minor, Health and Human Services
  • Sophia (Sophie) Leveque: Z. Smith Reynolds Library (Newport Beach, Calif.), Communication and English
  • Alexa King: Campus Life (Dallas, Texas), Psychology/minor, Health and Human Services
  • Aishwarya (Ash) Nagar: Wake Downtown/Biomedical Sciences and Engineering (New Delhi, India), Biology/minors, Religion, Neuroscience, Philosophy
  • Chanel Shulman: Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center (Myrtle Beach, S.C.), Psychology and Economics
  • Terry (T.J.) Smith: Provost’s Office (Greensboro, N.C.), Politics and International Studies
  • Camry Wilborn: Pro Humanitate Institute (Winston-Salem, N.C.), Politics and International Studies and Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies/minor, Communication

“My selection as a fellow means that I have been given a tremendous opportunity to continue to learn and grow while simultaneously giving back to the institution I have to come to love,” said T.J. Smith.  “I have the chance to be mentored by a cadre of esteemed leaders in what will be the developmental opportunity of a lifetime.”

As a fellow, Smith said, he expects “to gain a new insight and perspective into how the strategic direction and inner mechanics of the University come together to move our community forward.”

Alumni of the Wake Forest Fellows program have pursued careers in law, medicine, public policy and more. Several have since received prestigious academic awards such as Rhodes and Fulbright scholarships.

Magjuka named assistant dean, director

Wake Forest University head shots, Tuesday, October 7, 2014. Marianne Magjuka.

Marianne Magjuka has been named an assistant dean of students and director of democratic engagement and justice programs.

“This appointment acknowledges Marianne’s strong contributions to the community and organizationally strengthens the partnership between the Pro Humanitate Institute (PHI) and Division of Campus Life,” according to an  announcement by PHI and Campus Life. “Both areas share a commitment to providing meaningful social justice, civic engagement, and inclusion programs and initiatives for the university community.”

Magjuka will have a dual report to the executive director of PHI and the dean of students/associate vice president for Campus Life and will serve on the leadership teams of both areas.

In her current role as PHI’s director of democratic engagement and justice programs, Magjuka has directed social justice programs and overseen civic and democratic engagement initiatives. She has also directed sustained dialogue for students and staff for the Division of Campus Life and coordinated deliberative dialogue training and planning. Magjuka has also contributed to a number of university initiatives, including serving as co-chair for the Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement Task Force.

As an assistant dean of students and director, Marianne’s new responsibilities will include:
–providing leadership for Campus Life staff development initiatives designed to develop staff capacity to provide meaningful social justice and diversity and inclusion programs throughout the organization
–providing leadership for programs that offer incoming students the opportunity to engage in meaningful dialogue across differences
–providing services for students and their families experiencing personal, medical or mental health-related crises with focus on community education and response for campus climate and bias-related incidents

Magjuka first joined Wake Forest in January 2011 as the director of Campus Life. Previously, she served as the assistant director of community service and service-learning at Baylor University, and coordinated an AmeriCorps*VISTA program based at Florida State University. Magjuka received her B.A. and M.Ed. from the University of Notre Dame.

Application period open for Move More program

Move more Move OftenSpring semester applications are being accepted through Feb. 12 for the wellbeing project called Move More. Move Often.

The project, which is a research program (IRB# IRB00022164), is open to students, faculty and staff.

To apply, visit move.thrive.wfu.edu.

It is designed as an eight-week step challenge to encourage individuals to increase their daily physical activity. Using Fitbit activity trackers, participants can monitor their daily steps and activity. Throughout the eight-week challenge, participants can access performance incentives, receive supplemental resources and materials, as well as discounts.

Participants will be required to attend a one-hour orientation session. A Fitbit will be provided to participants. Participants may also use their own Fitbit, instead.

At the conclusion of the challenge, prizes will be awarded on an individual basis for significant improvement in the number of average daily steps. Following each challenge, participants will have the opportunity to re-enroll for additional challenges to keep improving their daily physical activity and potentially win more prizes.

The website offers additional information about Move More. Move Often. The site includes a list of resources and an FAQ section, for instance.

This project is co-sponsored by Office of Wellbeing, Campus Life, Health and Exercise Science, Environmental Health and Safety, Hospitality & Auxiliary Services, Residence Life and Housing, Information Technology, PDC Run, Forest, Run (Walk Forest), Therapeutic Lifestyle Change, Aramark, Campus Recreation.

New wellbeing project launched

A new wellbeing project is open to students, faculty and staff.  It is called Move More. Move Often.  This is a research program (IRB# IRB00022164)

To apply, visit move.thrive.wfu.edu.  Application period will continue through Oct. 6.

It is designed as an eight-week step challenge to encourage individuals to increase their daily physical activity.  Using Fitbit activity trackers, participants can monitor their daily steps and activity.  Throughout the eight-week challenge, participants can access performance incentives, receive supplemental resources and materials, as well as discounts.

Participants will be required to attend a one-hour orientation session.   A Fitbit will be provided to participants.  Participants may also use their own Fitbit, instead.

Continue reading »