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Wake Forest news for faculty and staff

It’s time to focus on annual benefits enrollment

This is a guest post from Human Resources:

Nearly 500 colleagues have completed Annual Benefits Enrollment. If you have not already done so, please join them by May 6. You will need to enroll if you are an eligible* faculty or staff member who is:

  • Changing benefit elections,
  • Adding or removing a dependent(s),
  • Covering an eligible spouse on the medical plan, and/or
  • Planning to participate in a Flexible Spending Account (you must actively enroll each year if you intend to continue your participation).

If you are adding a spouse and/or dependent child(ren) to the medical, dental, and/or vision plan(s), and you have not provided dependent verification documentation, you will need to submit a copy to Human Resources by May 6.

Contact the Benefits team at benefits@nullwfu.edu or 336.758.6404 with questions.

*Includes individuals eligible for medical coverage through the Affordable Care Act.

2016-17 Wake Forest Fellows selected

A group photo of the new Wake Forest Fellows for the 2016-17 academic year, in front of Reynolda Hall on Wednesday, April 27, 2016.

Wake Forest Fellows for 2016-17

Twelve seniors will remain in the Wake Forest campus community following graduation in May as Wake Forest Fellows.  They will work in offices across campus, including the President’s Office, the Pro Humanitate Institute, the Z. Smith Reynolds Library and the Office of Personal and Career Development.

Since 2008, the Wake Forest Fellows program has provided exceptional Wake Forest college graduates with the opportunity to work in higher education administration for a year. Each fellow will serve as a full-time Wake Forest employee, starting this summer.  In addition to working with top administrators in a particular department, the fellows will participate in leadership activities and interact with faculty, staff and students to learn about the inner workings of higher education.

“We’re welcoming a class of Fellows that has excelled across the campus in academics, in service, and in leadership,” said Marybeth Wallace, special assistant to President Nathan O. Hatch.  “We can’t wait to feel all of that youthful energy in our offices.”
This group also represents the first time that fellowships have been arranged for Reynolda House Museum of American Art, the Pro Humanitate Institute and Wake Downtown: Biomedical Sciences and Engineering.

The Wake Forest Fellows for 2016-17 are:

  • Olivia Clark: Reynolda House (Ellicott City, Md.), History/minor, Italian
  • Kent Garrett: Information Systems (Noblesville, Ind.), Sociology/minors, Journalism and Entrepreneurship
  • Brian Hart: Dean of the College (Oxford, N.C), Politics and International Affairs
  • Millicent Hennessey: President’s Office (New York, N.Y.), Chinese Language and Culture
  • Sarah Hoyle: Personal and Career Development (Clemmons, N.C.), Politics and International Affairs
  • Kylie Kinder: START Gallery (Oak Park, Calif.), Art History and Psychology
  • Alexa King: Campus Life (Dallas, Texas), Psychology/minor, Health and Human Services
  • Sophia (Sophie) Leveque: Z. Smith Reynolds Library (Newport Beach, Calif.), Communication and English
  • Alexa King: Campus Life (Dallas, Texas), Psychology/minor, Health and Human Services
  • Aishwarya (Ash) Nagar: Wake Downtown/Biomedical Sciences and Engineering (New Delhi, India), Biology/minors, Religion, Neuroscience, Philosophy
  • Chanel Shulman: Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center (Myrtle Beach, S.C.), Psychology and Economics
  • Terry (T.J.) Smith: Provost’s Office (Greensboro, N.C.), Politics and International Studies
  • Camry Wilborn: Pro Humanitate Institute (Winston-Salem, N.C.), Politics and International Studies and Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies/minor, Communication

“My selection as a fellow means that I have been given a tremendous opportunity to continue to learn and grow while simultaneously giving back to the institution I have to come to love,” said T.J. Smith.  “I have the chance to be mentored by a cadre of esteemed leaders in what will be the developmental opportunity of a lifetime.”

As a fellow, Smith said, he expects “to gain a new insight and perspective into how the strategic direction and inner mechanics of the University come together to move our community forward.”

Alumni of the Wake Forest Fellows program have pursued careers in law, medicine, public policy and more. Several have since received prestigious academic awards such as Rhodes and Fulbright scholarships.

Harriger named director for Wake Washington program

Wake Forest political science professor Katy Harriger poses in her office in Tribble Hall on Friday, November 4, 2011.

Katy Harriger

Katy Harriger, professor and chair of politics and international affairs, has been named faculty director of Wake Forest’s new Wake Washington program, which will combine academic and internship experiences in the nation’s capital.

Scheduled to launch in fall 2017, the program will provide students with “outstanding opportunities to explore what it means to be a citizen, a policy maker, and a leader,” said Michele Gillespie, dean of the College.

As faculty director, Harriger will oversee the program and serve as the on-site faculty member for the first semester of the program.

“Katy Harriger is one of our very best teacher-scholars and the perfect person for this new role,” Gillespie said. “Her commitment to students, unwavering expectation of rigorous learning in and out of the classroom, important scholarship on American politics, and leadership abilities are all exceptional.”

Each year, Wake Forest will offer a fall and spring semester program. Modeled after Wake Forest’s study abroad centers in Venice, Vienna and London, the new program will offer close faculty-student engagement and high academic standards. A faculty member will take 16 undergraduate students with them to Washington and teach courses in their area of expertise capitalizing on learning experiences available there.

The first set of classes will include “U.S. Policymaking in the 21st Century” and “American Constitutional Law: Separation of Powers and Federalism,” taught by Harriger. They will include visits to Capitol Hill, the Supreme Court and the White House. Future semesters could focus on art, communication, science or other fields of study.  Go here for the full story.

University to test Wake Alert’s emergency text message system

Thousands of students, faculty and staff are scheduled to receive a test text message on Tuesday, May 3, from Wake Forest’s emergency notification system.

The text will be sent as a test by the University Police Department at 5 p.m. to all who have registered online to receive emergency text messages.  Anyone who has not registered may be do so by visiting the University’s Wake Ready web site athttp://wakeready.wfu.edu/alert-methods/text-alerts.  Registration by undergraduates is required. Directions are provided for arranging to receive the messages, including the test message set for May 3.

The content of the text message will be, “This is a test of the WFU Emergency Mobile Phone Alert System.  It is not necessary to reply to this message.”

Continue reading »

Harris-Perry advances justice for women and girls of color

Wake Forest students and staff members in the Wake the Vote class pose for headshots on Tuesday, January 26, 2016. Professor Melissa Harris-Perry.

Melissa Harris-Perry, Maya Angelou Presidential Chair, spoke before the Congressional Caucus on Black Women and Girls April 28. The session allowed members of the Congressional Caucus on Black Women and Girls to explore the condition of black women in the United States through the testimony of black female academic, activists, celebrities and business women. Here is a link to the testimony she presented.

On April 29 and 30, Wake Forest’s Anna Julia Cooper Center – led by Harris-Perry – is hosting “Know Her Truths: Advancing Justice for Women & Girls of Color,” a national gathering focused on advancing justice for women and girls of color.

The conference is a key part of an ongoing, collaborative initiative to develop a meaningful research agenda addressing women and girls of color. The event will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Saturday, April 30 from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. in Benson University Center 401. Nearly 100 speakers and panelists representing more than 60 organizations and institutions will participate. The full agenda and list of speakers are available on the “Know Her Truths” website.

Watch the livestream of the conference here.

Harris-Perry has also been named a winner of the 2016 Hillman Prize for Broadcast Journalism. Since 1950, the Sidney Hillman Foundation has honored journalists who pursue investigative reporting and deep storytelling in service of the common good. Winners exemplify resourcefulness and courage in reporting, skilled storytelling, social impact and relevance to the ideals of Sidney Hillman.

She was recently named editor-at-large for Elle magazine.

Champions of Change honored at Sustainability Awards event

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Sustainability awards are announced at event on campus

This is a guest post from the Office of Sustainability:

Champions of Change Honored at Campus Sustainability Awards

The Wake Forest Campus Sustainability Awards presentation was held on Earth Day, April 22, in the Green Room of Reynolda Hall. A combination of students, faculty, and staff who have demonstrated or initiated successful sustainable practices on campus were recognized as Champions of Change.

Wake Forest University Provost Rogan Kersh and Executive Vice President Hof Milam recognized the following award recipients in four categories: Teaching, Research and Engagement; Resource Conservation; Service and Social Action; and Bright Ideas. Continue reading »

Wellbeing presents THRIVE Dimension Champions Award

The Office of Wellbeing presented the 2016 THRIVE Dimension Champions Awards for faculty and staff on April 20 at the Sutton Center.

The awards highlight the leadership and scholarship of faculty and staff across the eight dimensions of wellbeing.

“It’s an exciting time for the Office of Wellbeing and the entire campus,” said Malika Roman Isler, director of Wellbeing. “We are inspired by the deep commitment each of these individuals has shown to not only bettering themselves, but by example, encouraging our entire community to live full and meaningful lives.”

Award recipients include the following:

–Emotional Wellbeing: Michele Kurtz, Office of Student Engagement
–Environmental Wellbeing: Jim Mussetter, Facilities and Campus Services/Landscape Department
–Financial Wellbeing: Tom Benza, Office of Financial Aid
–Intellectual Wellbeing: William Hamilton, Department of German and Russian
–Occupational Wellbeing: Catherine Ross, Teaching and Learning Center
–Physical Wellbeing: Michael Terry, Advancement Gifts/Records
–Social Wellbeing: Margaret Kittrell, Student Health Service
–Spiritual Wellbeing: Sharon Jones, Aramark

Wake Forest establishes research center in the Amazon

The Centro de Innovación Científica Amazónico (CINCIA) has been established through Wake Forest’s Center for Energy, Environment, and Sustainability (CEES).

Wake Forest has received nearly $10 million in support to establish CINCIA – the largest grant received by the University. The new research center aims to develop transformative solutions to promote sustainable use of tropical landscapes, combat environmental destruction and improve human health in the Amazonian province of Madre de Dios (MDD) in Peru.

CINCIA will be led by the efforts of Wake Forest conservation biologist and CEES director Miles Silman, who will serve as the associate director for science; longtime colleague and a leading expert on mercury in the Amazon Luis Fernandez, who will serve as executive director; and Michelle Klosterman, director of academic development and assessment in the Office of Global Affairs at Wake Forest who will serve as associate director for outreach and communication.

The center will serve as an international hub for Peruvian and foreign scientists and affiliates to collaborate on critical priorities in Madre de Dios – restoration and reforestation, the reduction of human health threats from environmental mercury, detection of deforestation threats, and sustainability.

“The research center is about making sure that the local people and institutions in one of earth’s last best places have the scientific, technical and entrepreneurial capacity to make sustainable decisions on issues from development to public health to governance,” said Silman, who has conducted research in the region for more than 20 years, focusing on understanding biodiversity and the response of forest ecosystems to climate and land use changes over time.

“For me, personally, I feel like we’ve been given a great opportunity and we have a chance to bring our expertise to bear, to help a country-sized region of the Amazon develop sustainably,” said Silman. “Wake Forest houses a lot of expertise that is working to make the world a better place. If ever there was a project we’ve been involved with that embodies the University’s guiding principle of Pro Humanitate, this is it.”

You can read the CINCIA news announcement for more information.

 

Student Health Service making temporary move

This is a guest post from the Student Health Service:

After 16 years, the George C. Mackie Student Health Clinic is getting a major upgrade.

The crepe myrtles are in bloom outside of the student health building on the campus of Wake Forest University.

As part of the Reynolds Gymnasium renovation project, the Student Health Service will be temporarily relocated while their new clinic is being built.  The new clinic should be open in fall 2017.

Student Health will close its existing clinic doors on Thursday, May 5.  On Tuesday, May 24, Student Health will operate out of a modular clinic on North campus, Lot Q, near Dogwood Residence Hall.  This modular clinic was custom designed and built to allow Student Health to continue to offer the services that our Wake Forest Student need.  Student Health will be open in time for both summer sessions and operate on their normal summer schedule seeing patients from 8:30 – noon and 1:30 p.m. – 4 p.m. Monday – Friday.  Appointments can continued to be made online, through the patient portal, accessible via the student health website shs.wfu.edu.

Typically, summer volume at Student Health is much lower than during the academic year.  This will afford the clinic a couple of months to fine tune policies, protocols and procedures to ensure efficiency in the fall.

In the fall, clinic, pharmacy, lab, psychiatric and case management resources will not be impacted.  Student Health will have clinic hours during the weekdays and a nurse will be on site (with a physician on call) after hours and on weekends.  Telephone numbers for the clinic will not change.  We invite all students, faculty and staff to come see our temporary space and say hello anytime this summer.  If you have any questions please contact Darren Aaron, Associate Director, SHS ataarondo@nullwfu.edu.

A message from President Hatch

This message from President Hatch was e-mailed to students, faculty and staff on April 25:

Dear Wake Forest students, faculty and staff,

The conclusion of spring semester offers an opportunity for reflection. Recently, I’ve been thinking about the nature of our campus – a dynamic learning community that embraces individuals. Together, through face-to-face conversation, we increasingly appreciate differences and engage each other with respect and understanding. Each day, we continue to create a better culture and an institution that is greater than the sum of our parts.

Saturday marked one month since HB2 became state law. This controversial measure limits civil rights protections for members of the LGBTQ community in North Carolina.

The operations of private institutions, like Wake Forest, are not directly affected by this legislation. Our non-discrimination statement provides protection for gender identity and sexual orientation. However, there is no doubting HB2’s negative impact on members of our university community and the greater Winston-Salem and North Carolina community; on our institution, as we seek to recruit, retain and welcome students, faculty, staff and visitors; and on our society, as it works to appreciate differences in an increasingly polarized culture.

A university is a place where academic freedom and freedom of expression are fundamental. It’s a place where community members can voice their beliefs – whether progressive or conservative, radical or traditional. It’s a place where we prize diversity, equity and a culture that encourages success and fulfillment for all. It’s a place where we strive to enhance students’ capability to disagree, in a spirit of courtesy and friendship, with those whose opinions they do not understand or appreciate. And it’s a place where we stand up for one another in the face of discrimination.

It has been well documented that HB2 was passed hastily. Even as lawmakers reconvene today, the pressing question for me – as a citizen and as a university president – is how we seek solutions that affirm the diversity among us. In North Carolina, a state that has long mediated conservative and progressive traditions, it is unfortunate that our leaders have not found common ground in ways that recognize the equality of all of our citizens.

The divisive nature of HB2 is in sharp contrast with the inclusive values of Wake Forest. For this, among other reasons, I wish to make clear my opposition to it. If you haven’t already, I encourage you to read the story on our website about the efforts of our administrators, faculty, staff and students in support of the LGBTQ community on our campus and indeed everywhere. I am grateful for the leadership of Angela Mazaris, who, along with many allies and advocates, works to advance equality and fairness every day. I have great appreciation for her support of our LGBTQ community and her efforts to help educate our entire campus about issues of gender identity and sexual orientation.

Together, we have worked to make Wake Forest more diverse and welcoming, and a place where students learn the art of conversation, practice thoughtful deliberation and engage in meaningful dialogue with one another. As the semester comes to a close, let us continue to do so in the spirit of Pro Humanitate.

Sincerely,

Nathan O. Hatch

President