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Inside WFU

Wake Forest news for faculty and staff

University to offer class on responding to dangerous situations

In July and August, Wake Forest will be offering a class on how to respond to an active shooter situation.

The class is being offered through the Professional Development Center (PDC).  Registration is through the PDC.

It will be taught by Wake Forest Emergency Manager August Vernon and University Police Sergeant Lesia Finney.

The class is called WFU Active Shooter Response (Run, Hide, Fight) Lunch and Learn.

According to the PDC posting, the program will provide actions people can take in case of a workplace or active assailant incident.  The class will stress awareness, preparation and rehearsal.

For details on dates and locations, visit the PDC web site.

Centers and institutes update

The Office of the Provost has approved a one-year planning grant to establish the Eudaimonia Institute to study human flourishing.

The institute aims to create an interdisciplinary intellectual community of researchers, scholars, and students who will investigate the nature of eudaimonia—Aristotle’s word for “happiness,” “flourishing,” or “wellbeing”—as well as the political and economic institutions, the moral beliefs and attitudes, and the cultural practices that enable and encourage eudaimonia.

James Otteson, the Thomas W. Smith Presidential Chair in Business Ethics, will serve as Executive Director of the Eudaimonia Institute. He will continue to serve as Executive Director of the BB&T Center for the Study of Capitalism.

The Eudaimonia Institute is the third academic institute at Wake Forest. It joins the Humanities Institute, led by Wake Forest Kahle Professor of Religion Mary Foskett, and the Pro Humanitate Institute, led by Maya Angelou Presidential Chair and Professor of Politics and International Affairs Melissa Harris-Perry.

The Provost also recently approved renewals of the Center for Energy, Environment, and Sustainability (CEES) and the Center for Molecular Signaling (CMS), formerly known as the Center for Molecular Communication and Signaling (CMCS).

Miles Silman, the Andrew Sabin Family Foundation Presidential Chair in Conservation Biology, is the director of CEES. Biology professor Gloria Muday directs CMS.

June 2016 faculty and staff milestones

See a list of faculty and staff milestones in June 2016:

Continue reading »

New Wake Forest weather stations offer weather data for all

WeatherStemInsideWFUNow is the time of the year when many at Wake Forest are asking, “How hot is it?” Two new weather stations installed on campus will answer that question and many others about the weather around the clock.

The WeatherSTEM stations were installed, recently, on top of the Miller Center and the scoreboard at BB&T Field.  They use a combination of weather instruments and sensors to take environmental measurements and offer frequently updated details on temperature, humidity, the heat index, barometric pressure and much more.

Each station includes a sky camera, with one directed toward Kentner Stadium, Farrell Hall and Wait Chapel, while the other camera is directed across BB&T Field.

While the weather stations are useful for anyone interested in weather at and around the University, they offer valuable information to a number of University departments and groups, including the Wake Forest Police Department and the University’s Crisis Management Team.

Anyone with access to the internet can visit the web sites for the weather stations located at the Miller Center and BB&T Field.  Each web site has a link to the other. The links are labeled “WEATHERSTEM UNITS” and can be found at the top right side of the sites. Continue reading »

May 2016 comings and goings

See a list of employees joining and leaving the University in May 2016:

Continue reading »

Jones ​reappointed Graduate School Dean

brad.jones.440x220Brad Jones has been reappointed to a second term as Dean of the Graduate Programs in the Arts & Sciences. Jones, a professor of chemistry at Wake Forest since 1989, is also an alumnus, completing his BS degree in chemistry in 1984.

“Dean Jones has proved both a dedicated steward of our wealth of Ph.D. and masters programs on the Reynolda campus, as well as a creative leader during a complex time for graduate education nationally,” said Provost Rogan Kersh. “Launching dynamic new programs, enhancing the School’s budget, and securing the striking new Brookstown space in downtown Winston-Salem: all these add up to a time of real innovation across Dean Jones’s tenure to date.”

“Over the past few years the Graduate School has taken some bold steps that are just beginning to pay off.  As we move forward, I hope to establish a sense of place for a school that embraces disparate programs.  I also aim to create a distinctive edge for our students by communicating their magnificent scholarship via digital storytelling techniques.  This is an exciting time to be in the Graduate School.”

Under the joint supervision of Jones and Dwayne Godwin, Dean of the Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences, Wake Forest’s Graduate School now features 30 masters and Ph.D. disciplinary or interdisciplinary programs, and sponsors 12 programs jointly with the schools of Medicine (MD/PhD, MD/MS, MD/MA & MMS/PhD), Business (MBA/PhD), Divinity (MA/MDiv), and College (BS/BA & MA). More than 800 students are enrolled in the graduate school.

In 2015, several Arts & Sciences graduate programs moved all or part of their teaching and research/creative activities to restored mill space at 200 Brookstown Avenue; a number of graduate school administrators moved to Brookstown as well.

Read more about the Graduate School @Brookstown in the news story, “New moves transcend boundaries.”

Creative excellence earns WFU 8 Gold Awards from CASE

Writer Ta-Nehisi Coates speaks at Wake Forest University as part of the Voices of Our Time series in Wait Chapel on Tuesday, November 17, 2015.

“Voices of Our Time – Ta’Nehisi Coates” poster won the Grand Gold Award.

Wake Forest continues to raise the bar of creative excellence for best practices in advancement, winning eight varying Gold Awards in the annual 2016 Circle of Excellence awards program sponsored by The Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE).

Wake Forest Magazine received the Gold Award in the General Interest Magazines category, circulation 37,000+. “Wake Forest obviously is doing everything right … someone here is thinking about how images enhance storytelling – something we wished we had seen in more magazines.”

The magazine also won the Gold Award in the category Staff Periodicals Writing. The entry included “The Hidden Gym,”  “Family Trees” and “Inside Pitch” by managing editor Cherin C. Poovey; “Look at Her Now” by Maria Henson, associate vice president and editor-at-large; and “Real-Life Drama” by senior editor Kerry M. King.

The judges noted: “This publication truly sets the gold standard for alumni magazines that aspire to inform, affirm, entertain and engage. Each story was allowed to develop and fully engage the reader.”

The Communications and External Relations team received a total of six Gold Awards for a range of creative work in varying categories.

For the Multi-page Publication which had 94 entries, the team won the Grand Gold Award for “iPlace Viewbook” which was noted for its “edgy, outside the box, design” and use of bold colors. “The combination of photography and line drawing to provide visual explanation was very well done,” noted the judges.

In the Posters category with 32 entries, the Grand Gold Award was achieved for “Voices of Our Time – Ta’Nehisi Coates” which was, according to judges’ comments, an “overwhelming favorite.” The entry was described as “compelling,” “stunning” and “a rare design that goes beyond its intended project or purpose and creates additional rich communication opportunities.”

In the Specialty Pieces category with 49 entries, the team won the Gold Award for the “Demon Deacon Playing Cards,” for an “unusual and irresistible annual fund campaign.” The cards were described as “beautiful and fun, with quality typography and a restrained black-and-gold color palette highlighted by pops of silver and gold foil on the card packaging. The judges kept returning to this entry, wanting to handle the cards and keep flipping through.”

A Grand Gold Award was received in the Annual Giving Programs category out of 38 entries for “Naming Rights for the Rest of Us,” a campaign created to celebrate the donors whose smaller annual gifts make a big difference. The judges said: “The institution took items from around campus that held significance and offered exclusive naming rights for several lucky donors – items like the telephone of the man who makes the call when classes are canceled due to weather, the leaf blower that always seems to be operating outside a dorm window at 7am, and the skillet of a legendary campus chef.”

Out of 51 entries in the Annual Reports & Fund Reports, Wake won the Gold Award for “Year Two,” which judges described as a “daring departure from the standard cookie-cutter annual report. The design was modern and accessible and the narrative compelling.”

For the Viewbooks and Prospectuses (Print) category, which had 52 entries, the University won the Gold Award for the “Admissions Viewbook.” Judges noted that the entry “created a tone and visual energy that could provide answers to prospective students in ways that conjure the student experience.”

The awards competition received 3,356 entries for consideration in nearly 100 categories from more than 713 higher education institutions, independent schools and affiliated organizations located worldwide.

CASE is one of the largest international associations of education institutions with more than 3,600 member colleges and universities and honors outstanding work in advancement services, alumni relations, communications, fundraising and marketing at colleges, universities, independent schools and affiliated nonprofits.

Faculty publications: May 2016 updates

Dalton, Mary M., Max Dosser, Katie Nelson, & Rebecca Steiner, Eds. (Communication). Critical Media Studies: Student Essays on Deadwood (Critical Media Studies, Vol. 2). Library Partners Press. May 2016.

Dalton, Mary M. & Laura R. Linder, Eds. (Communication). The Sitcom Reader: America Re-viewed, Still Skewed, 2nd ed. State University of New York Press. May 2016.

Echeverría, Andrea. (Romance Languages). El despertar de los awquis: Migración y utopia en la poesía de Gloria Mendoza y Boris Espezúa. Paracaídas Editores. May 2016.

Fogel, Daniel S. (Sustainability). Strategic Sustainability: A Natural Environmental Lens on Organizations and Management. Routledge. April 2016.

Lubin, David M. (Art). Grand Illusions: American Art and the First World War. Oxford University Press. May 2016.

10 tech tools for teaching

Come join us for a 30 minute “highlight reel” exploring faculty use cases for technologies used in teaching around campus. We will see how faculty are using tools like Sakai, Google, WebEx, VoiceThread, and other collaborative technologies in our classrooms. The class will be interactive. Please bring your laptop, smartphone or tablet.

Registration will assist us in obtaining an accurate head count prior to the event: http://pdc.wfu.edu/events/2661/

Locations

June 15: Greene Hall
June 15: Carswell Hall
June 16: Winston Hall
June 16: Salem Hall
June 29: Scales Fine Arts Center
June 29: Worrell Hall
June 30: Tribble Hall
June 30: Kirby Hall
July 12: Olin Hall
July 12: Winston Hall
July 13: Greene Hall
July 13: Scales Fine Arts Center
July 19: Wingate Hall
July 19: Greene Hall
July 20: Tribble Hall
July 20: Salem Hall

Update to 6/11 off-campus shooting

A message from Wake Forest Communications and External Relations

The Winston-Salem Police Department has issued additional descriptions of the vehicle and suspects involved in the Saturday morning robbery and shooting of Wake Forest University student Plato Collins “Lins” Barwick IV:

The suspect vehicle has been described as a black colored, full size, sport utility vehicle equipped with chrome trim. The vehicle is believed to be a 2009 or newer model. 

The suspects are described as follows:

Suspect #1 is described as a black male, medium complexion, 17 to 19 years of age, approximately five feet six inches in height. Suspect #1 has small braids or twists in his hair, which are approximately one-inch in length. At the time this incident occurred, Suspect #1 was wearing a flat bill cap and armed with a firearm.

Suspect #2 is described as a black male, approximately six feet tall, with a thin build and very short hair. Suspect #2 was described as wearing a chin strap style beard.

Suspect #3 was described only as a black male and was reportedly the driver of the sport utility vehicle.

The area in which this crime occurred is a residential community. Authorities are optimistic that other residents may have observed the suspect vehicle in the area near the time this incident occurred or that someone will recognize the suspect and suspect vehicle descriptions.

Anyone with information regarding this crime is asked to contact the Winston-Salem Police Department at 336-773- 7700 or CrimeStoppers at 336-727- 2800.

Police are increasing patrols on campus and in the surrounding area.

Timely warning notices are required to contain information that may help others avoid becoming the victim of a similar crime. For information that promotes safety and aids in the prevention of similar incidents, visit:  http://wakeready.wfu.edu/crime-prevention-and-safety-tips/

This information is provided in compliance with federal statute 20 U.S.C. § 1092(f) The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, better known as the Clery Act.