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Inside WFU

Wake Forest news for faculty and staff

Guest Post

WakeUnited: Live United Ryan Janvion

Janvion.Ryan.300x175Ryan Janvion, a business enterprise management major from Miami, Fla., is deeply involved at Wake Forest because he wants to make a difference.

Janvion, a member of the Wake Forest football team, is active in Athletes in Action and the Student Athlete Advisory Committee, which often participates in community service events.

“Some of my activities include speaking at different schools around Winston-Salem to encourage students to chase their dreams and rise up to the challenges they will face throughout their journeys,” says Janvion. “I have a tremendous amount of respect for the United Way and believe what it does for the community really has an impact on many lives for the better.”

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Fresh Food Network delivers local foods to campus

freshfoodnetworkGuest post by junior Jake Teitelbaum

Do you ever wish you could buy more local produce, meats or dairy, but simply don’t have time to make it to the farmer’s market?

Fresh Food Network, launched last semester, is an entirely student run e-commerce venture making it easier for members of the Wake Forest community to buy local and organic foods.

To purchase items, visit www.FreshFN.com to see what’s fresh around town and place your order anytime from Sunday evening through Thursday at 10 p.m. Choose whether you will pick up your order on Thursday or Friday (Note: Orders placed after Wednesday at 5 p.m. will be available for pick up on Friday).

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WakeUnited: Live United Matt Williams

matt.williams.300x175OPCD’s associate director for marketing and communications, Matt Williams, is a graduate of Project Blueprint, a leadership development program sponsored by the United Way that increases the participation of individuals from under-represented groups on nonprofit and community boards. Participants receive training and support to drive change in these organizations where diverse perspectives and experiences are needed and valued.

“I graduated from Project Blueprint in 2012 and found it incredibly helpful,” says Williams. “I received instruction on strategic and financial planning, diversity and inclusion, operational processes and more. The experience introduced me to other citizens seeking to use their strengths to serve and familiarized me with organizations working to eradicate many challenges within our community.”

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Giving thanks every day, not just on Thanksgiving

richwine.175x275A guest post by Jennifer Richwine, University Advancement’s executive director of the Washington, D.C., office.

Thank you notes were non-negotiable in my house growing up. My mother was a stickler on writing thank you notes when we received gifts for birthdays or holidays, and often we weren’t even allowed to enjoy the gift until the thank you note was written, stamped and in the mail. Like most children, I balked at the idea and hated trying to come up with the right thing to say.

As an adult I moved into my first job, my first apartment, my first time truly on my own and became more disconnected from the people who had always been so prevalent in my life. I realized how much I missed these friends and family and wondered if they understood just how important they were to me.

With Gratitude

  • Jennifer Richwine’s “With Gratitude: The Power of the Thank You Note” is available on Amazon, which recently named it the number one new release in business etiquette. It was published through CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform with help from Wake Forest’s digital publishing expert Bill Kane. The book is also available as e-book through Wake Forest Digital Publishing.

So one Thanksgiving, I decided to make a list of the people who had been important influences in my life over the past year, and I proceeded to write thank you notes to every single person on that list, thanking them for a kindness, a friendship, a piece of well-timed advice. And as I wrote, I began to feel like I was bursting with joy for all of these people I had in my life. I never realized just how fortunate I was until I actually put onto paper and into words why I was thankful for them.

As the notes began arriving in mailboxes, my phone started ringing. Friends and colleagues and family were delighted, surprised, thankful themselves, to receive my notes of thanksgiving. Common phrases were “I didn’t know it meant so much to you,” or “I can’t believe you took the time to write that,” or “I’ve never been thanked for just being me before.” It quickly became clear that something special was happening.

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Open access: What is it? Why do we need it?

molly.keener.300x175By Sara Hendricks, Wake Forest News Office intern

Access to scholarship has traditionally been reserved for those who subscribe to academic journals or those who attend or work at an institution with subscriptions. A personal subscription can cost upwards of $1,000 per year. Library subscriptions run much higher, with ZSR’s most expensive journals costing tens of thousands of dollars.

But what if academic research could become more accessible, more immediate and less impenetrable? This is the goal of the open access movement, which aims to provide “free, immediate, online availability of research articles, coupled with the rights to use these articles fully in the digital environment,” according to the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition.

Learn more about open access

In 2010, the Z. Smith Reynolds Library Librarians’ Assembly adopted an open access policy. However, it applies only to library faculty scholarship, not all faculty scholarship, so there’s room to grow.

Misperceptions that publishing in an open access journal is less prestigious than publishing in a traditional journal abound, but Scholarly Communication Librarian Molly Keener says some of the most respected journals are published open access.

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Project pumpkin

pumpkins.300x175Kick-off your Halloween festivities at the 26th annual Project Pumpkin on Wednesday, Oct. 29 from 3-6 p.m.

Project Pumpkin, an annual service event for children from the Winston-Salem community, is put on by Wake Forest students, faculty and staff who offer a fun and safe trick-or-treating experience. This year’s festival will have a “Space Jam” theme based on the 1990s Looney Tunes movie featuring basketball great Michael Jordan.

The children of faculty and staff are welcome to attend the festival and see the spirit of Pro Humanitate in action. In addition to student-run carnival games, many departments will have a booth with a fun game or activity for your child to enjoy. The festival will be crowded, so please make sure that your child is supervised at all times.

Want to learn more? Please visit the Project Pumpkin website or contact Victoria Lawton, student publicity chair.

Inaugural ‘Lifelong Learning’ event: Q & A with David Lubin

David Lubin

A guest post by Madeline Stone, Wake Forest News and Communication Intern

World War I marked the beginning of a period when a soldier could be severely injured in battle and still survive. In his research on art and World War War I, Charlotte C. Weber Professor of Art David Lubin discovered the work of Anna Coleman Ladd, an American sculptor who began creating prosthetic facial masks for disfigured soldiers.

Ladd’s work became the inspiration for “Flags and Faces: The Visual Culture of America’s First World War,” Lubin’s upcoming book. His findings have been featured in recent weeks in the Washington Post and on NPR’s All Things Considered.

On Oct. 27, Lubin will present “Behind the Mask: World War I, Plastic Surgery, and the Modern Beauty Revolution,” the inaugural Lifelong Learning lecture at 7:30 p.m. at the Byrum Center Auditorium. The lecture will address facial disfigurement, and the subsequent transformation in beauty standards for women, as evidenced by movie star photography, the growth of the makeup industry, and the advent of beauty pageants such as Miss America.

This event is free and open to the public.

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Exercise your intellectual wellbeing

roz.tedford.200x300A guest post by Roz Tedford, director for research and instruction, and politics and international affairs liaison, Z. Smith Reynolds Library

We are bombarded with information every day. Some is important, some is interesting and some is simply noise. Taking time to attend to the important and interesting bits while filtering out the noise is both healthy and important. It is also the foundation of intellectual wellbeing.

Eleanor Roosevelt said “I think, at a child’s birth, if a mother could ask a fairy godmother to endow it with the most useful gift, that gift would be curiosity.” Curiosity is the very heart of intellectual wellbeing. It is not about knowing anything in particular, it is about being open to learning new things no matter where you are – in a class, at dinner with a new friend or watching television when you can’t sleep. So click that interesting link online and read that book that catches your eye.

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Develop your personal spiritual wellbeing through mindfulness

tim.auman.300x175A guest post by Chaplain Tim Auman

If there is a secret to spiritual wellbeing, it is this: when we are present, when our attention is fully in the moment, our lives are deepened and transformed.

The idea of developing mindfulness in the midst of our crazy, chaotic world, might be perceived as dubious. Think about the number of distractions that characterize most of our lives. We have emails to read, texts to send, pictures to post on Facebook. It seems that every academic year leads to an exponential increase in the distractions that occupy our minds, and absorb our attention, energy and exuberance for life.

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The Arnett and Buckley ‘Top 10 Ways to Get Social at WFU’

rolling.the.quad.300x175A guest post by Kathy Arnett, director of the Student Union and James Buckley, director of the Benson University Center

Social wellbeing is the result of our positive and regular interactions with others in a variety of settings. Studies have shown that development and sustenance of our relationships is vital to happiness.

Contrary to pop-culture-fueled perceptions, social interaction isn’t just for kids anymore. In fact, the older you are, the more you need it.

Below is the Arnett and Buckley “Top 10 Ways to Get Social at WFU” where faculty and staff can enjoy some time with each other and with students. Think about your top 10 and get busy being social.

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