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Inside WFU

Wake Forest news for faculty and staff

Guest Post

Tulip bulbs to be offered to campus community this spring

Tulips bloom outside Alumni Hall on the campus of Wake Forest University las year.

This is a guest post from the Landscape Team in Facilities and Campus Services:

Spring has almost arrived and we will enjoy many colorful beds of tulips planted by the F&CS Landscape Team.

Once the tulips have finished their colorful display they will be pulled from the beds to make way for the summer annual beds.

The Landscape Team would like to share these bulbs with the campus community.  You can take them home and the Landscape Team will give you instructions on how to repurpose your bulbs.  Timing will depend on “spring,” but they will have bulbs for several weeks in late March and April.  If you are interested please send an e-mail to Jim Coffey at coffeyjb@nullwfu.edu.

Allison McWilliams: Mentors as Connectors

Allison McWilliams, director of mentoring and alumni personal and career development in the Office of Personal and Career Development, writes occasional articles for Inside WFU.  This is the third for the spring semester.  In each, she shares observations and suggestions with faculty and staff from her professional experience with students.

Effective mentors facilitate their mentees’ abilities to create and work towards specific learning goals. They do this by asking questions, providing objective feedback and guidance, and serving as a connector to opportunities and resources. Serving as a connector is one of the key strategies that we have identified in our Mentoring Learning Outcomes and can be one of the easiest and most effective ways that you can support your mentee.

From a career development perspective, finding a job and building a career today is as much about who you know as it is about what you know. Additionally, both research and practice demonstrate that we are better off developing networks of people who are willing to help us to achieve our goals, than to rely on one person to do it all. As organizational psychologist Adam Grant notes in his book Give and Take, effective networks, those that contain both strong and weak ties, provide access to private information, diverse skills, and power. As an added benefit, those who willingly provide that access, the givers, tend to be more successful than those who are out for their own gain alone. Being a connector pays off.

The rise of social media tools like Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn show the power of effective networks in action. No longer are we limited to our immediate social or professional circles of influence; through the power of technology one can find instant connections with hundreds or thousands of individuals across the globe. One of my favorite social media moments was reconnecting with the very first pre-school friend I had in this world, when I discovered that she was “Facebook friends” with someone whom I know in adulthood. These tools give us the opportunity to put the old “Six Degrees of Separation” game into action on a regular basis.

Being a connector does not require special skills or life experiences. It requires maintaining a healthy curiosity about other people’s skills and experiences, and a genuine desire to help others be successful when they need it. The power of effective mentorship lies not in the impersonal distant connection but in the interpersonal exchange of ideas, aspirations, goals, and action plans. Effective mentors open doors and give their mentees the needed push to walk through them. Only by knowing who your mentee is and what his or her goals are, can you know which are the right doors to open.

It’s time to nominate Champions of Change

This is a guest post of the Office of Sustainability:

Do you know an individual who has made an impact on campus sustainability during their time at Wake Forest? Nominate him or her for a 2017 Champions of Change Award.

This year’s winners will be recognized at the fourth annual Campus Sustainability Awards ceremony on March 22. Staff, faculty, and students are all eligible for this awards program, and nominations can be made in the following categories: resource conservation, academics and engagement, service and social action, leadership, and bright ideas.

Nominate yourself or someone else as a Champion of Change for campus sustainability by Friday, March 3. The Champions of Change will be recognized at a ceremony on March 22 in the Reynolda Hall Green Room at 4:00 p.m.

We look forward to celebrating the work of sustainable change agents across campus. For more information, visit the Office of Sustainability website.

IS offering support for Google 2-Step Verification

This is a guest post from Information Systems:

Stop by the Information Systems tent in the 3rd floor lobby of Benson on Wednesday, February 15th between 9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. and an IS support representative will assist you with setting up Google 2-Step Verification on your mobile device.

Here’s why!

  • Protects your privacy and data against hackers

  • Secures your Gmail and other Google login enabled apps

  • Takes less than 5 minutes of your time with an expert available to assist and answer questions

  • It’s free but the value is priceless

Provost Kersh: Convocation to be held Feb. 16 in Wait Chapel

This message was emailed to the University community, recently, by Provost Rogan Kersh:

Dear Wake Forest Community,

Each year, the Wake Forest family gathers for the Founders’ Day Convocation to observe the University’s founding in February of 1834. Wake Forest will hold Founders’ Day Convocation on Thursday, February 16, at 4:00 p.m. in Wait Chapel.

We will award the Medallion of Merit, the highest honor bestowed by the University, to James Barefield, Professor Emeritus of History, and Herman E. Eure, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Biology. Faculty awards will be presented in the areas of advising, teaching and service. As is Wake Forest tradition, we will also have the opportunity to hear outstanding seniors read this year’s winning Senior Orations and the Class of 2017 will be honored with a reflective video featuring student testimonials.

The Office of the Provost will be hosting a reception immediately following the convocation in the Green Room.

Best regards,

Rogan Kersh
Provost

Facilities/Campus Services launches staff recognition program

This a guest post from Facilities and Campus Services:

Facilities and Campus Services will launch its newly-created staff recognition program on February 13. “F&CS-elect” will recognize staff for demonstrating one or more of five values integral to the operations of the department.

The nomination process begins with a WFU colleague (faculty, staff or student) submitting a narrative about a Facilities & Campus Services staff member who has demonstrated an outstanding service or project, etc. The employee can be nominated for: efficiency, leadership, ethical behavior, customer focus, and/or teamwork. Points are awarded based on efforts/skills, and the summation of points will determine the level of award received.

The Facilities & Campus Services staff work diligently across the campus community to create, maintain, and service the campus for our faculty, staff, and students. Often their work is accomplished behind the scenes with very little impact to anyone’s day. This program encourages an on-going culture of recognition so that the critical work our staff performs can be commended and rewarded, on a continual basis.

Nominations can be submitted at any time on the F&CS website http://facilities.wfu.edu/

Questions about the process may be directed to Janice Schuyler at schuyljc@nullwfu.edu or ext. 5679.

Office of Wellbeing: It’s time to nominate Wellbeing Champions

This is a guest post from the Office of Wellbeing:

It’s time to nominate your Wellbeing Champions!

The Office of Wellbeing is proud to recognize those within the Wake Forest Community who have embraced one of the eight dimensions of wellbeing: emotional, environmental, financial, intellectual, occupational, physical, social, and spiritual.

In order to do so, we need your help!

Our Dimension Champion awards go to faculty or staff members who best embody the spirit of wellbeing through their contributions to the Wake Forest University community. One champion is selected in each area. To nominate someone (or yourself) who you feel has worked to inspire a culture of wellbeing, visit thrive.wfu.edu and click on Dimension Champions.  A list of previous champions can be found on the Dimension Champions web page.

Nominations are open until Tuesday, March 7.

Allison McWilliams: Owning (and sharing) your learning goals

Allison McWilliams, director of mentoring and alumni personal and career development in the Office of Personal and Career Development, writes occasional articles for Inside WFU.  This is the second for the spring semester.  In each, she shares observations and suggestions with faculty and staff from her professional experience with students.

Allison McWilliams, the Director of Career Education in the Wake Forest Office of Personal and Career Development on Monday, October 10, 2011.

Effective mentoring relationships are built around intentional action towards defined goals. Why should mentoring partners set goals? Mentoring goals help define expectations for the relationship and help define how you and your mentee will know when the relationship has been successful. Mentoring goals also provide a framework for the conversations that will take place during the relationship and for the work that the mentee will be doing.

For example, a student working on a research project might have as a goal, “Create a draft article to submit for publication by the end of the semester.” As the mentor, you can frame your mentoring conversations around the progress the student is making towards accomplishing that goal, stumbling blocks he or she encounters along the way, and how that goal connects to the student’s larger academic and career goals. This SMART goal also provides a timeline for the relationship – the end of the semester – and a measure of accountability, whether or not an article is completed.

Effective mentors facilitate their mentee’s ability to create, work towards, and achieve his or her goals. And, while the focus of any mentoring relationship should always rest squarely on the mentee, as a mentor you also should take the time to set learning goals of your own. What is it that you hope to accomplish during the course of this relationship? How will you learn and grow? Sharing your goals and your progress towards achieving them is another way that you role model behavior and provide an additional mentoring conversation opportunity. It also allows you to demonstrate the value of a adopting a growth mindset, the belief that innate talent and intelligence does not pre-determine our abilities to continue to develop, learn, and achieve throughout our lives.

If you’re struggling to come up with goals for your mentoring relationship, you can use the Mentoring Learning Outcomes and self-evaluations to identify one or more areas where you would like to see improvement for yourself. Each of the four Mentoring Learning Outcomes has four associated strategies which provide multiple opportunities for growth. For example, you may want to work on your ability to ask thought-provoking questions and practice active listening skills in your mentoring conversations. As you begin your mentoring relationship, share this goal with your mentee and ask for feedback on your progress. Effective mentors willingly disclose their own challenges and successes as appropriate to the mentoring relationship.

It’s time to nominate people for Champions of Change Award

This is a guest post from the Office of Sustainability:

Do you know an individual who has made an impact on campus sustainability during their time at Wake Forest? Nominate him or her for a 2017 Champions of Change Award.

This year’s winners will be recognized at the fourth annual Campus Sustainability Awards ceremony on March 22.

Staff, faculty, and students are all eligible for this awards program, and nominations can be made in the following categories: resource conservation, academics and engagement, service and social action, leadership, and bright ideas. Nominate yourself or someone else as a Champion of Change for campus sustainability by Friday, March 3, 2017.

The Champions of Change will be recognized at a ceremony on March 22 in the Reynolda Hall Green Room at 4 p.m. We look forward to celebrating the work of sustainable change agents across campus. For more information, visit the Office of Sustainability website.

WISE 2017 Conference registration ends Jan. 30

This is a guest post from the Center for Global Programs & Studies:

logo-with-tag-line-for-nametags-version-2The WISE Conference, Feb. 8-10, is for faculty and staff seeking to incorporate more intercultural competency methods into their teaching and interactions with students. The Center for Global Programs & Studies is pleased to host our 9th annual conference focused on intercultural learning for international educators across the nation.  Wake Forest faculty and staff may attend at no cost.

The keynote speaker will be Amer Ahmed, director of intercultural teaching and faculty development at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

It will be held at the Marriott Hotel in downtown Winston-Salem.  Shuttles will be available. A detailed schedule for shuttles will be distributed prior to the conference.

Register now using our designated Eventbrite page for Wake Forest faculty, staff and students. Registration closes Monday, Jan. 30, at 4 p.m.  Preview descriptions of conference sessions on the WISE website.  The conference’s schedule and much more is on the website.

If you have any questions about WISE 2017 or are interested in a pre-conference workshop, please contact us at wiseconference@nullwfu.edu or 336-758-5994.

We look forward to the insightful contributions of Wake Forest faculty and staff to the conference discussions in February.