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Inside WFU

Wake Forest news for faculty and staff

Guest Post

A message from President Hatch regarding new University policy

A message from President Hatch to students, faculty and staff:

Wake Forest University is firmly committed to providing an academic and working community free from unlawful discrimination and harassment in all forms. Consistent with Wake Forest’s Notice of Non-discrimination and in compliance with federal statutes and recent Department of Education guidance, the University has implemented a revised Faculty and Staff Sexual Harassment Prevention Policy. The revised policy is effective September 1, 2015 and will apply to reports of sexual misconduct, including gender discrimination and sexual harassment, against a University faculty or staff member on the Reynolda campus. The Faculty and Staff Sexual Harassment Prevention Policy includes information about the various forms of sexual misconduct covered under the policy, how to report an incident of sexual misconduct, resolution and appeal procedures and resources available to members of the Wake Forest community.

In the fall, the Title IX Office and Human Resources will hold open forums so faculty, staff and students may receive additional clarification about the policy. For more information or to report a concern regarding sexual misconduct, please contact the University’s Title IX Coordinator, Tanya Jachimiak.

The University will take seriously every allegation or report of sexual misconduct received. This policy and the University’s response are intended to ensure that all parties involved receive appropriate support and fair treatment, and that allegations of sexual misconduct are handled in a prompt, thorough, and equitable manner.  Thank you for your assistance as together we build a stronger community.

Sincerely,

Nathan O. Hatch
President

A welcome back message from President Hatch for 2015-2016

A message from President Hatch to students, faculty and staff:

Welcome to the 2015-2016 academic year. I can still remember coming to Wake Forest for the first time ten years ago. The same excitement and optimism that filled me then returns at the start of each new fall semester. From year to year, there are plans and surprises, but what I’ve come to know about this community is that it approaches challenges with great passion and careful consideration. With that in mind, let me offer three thoughts to contemplate as we begin a new year together.

LEARN TOGETHER
I encourage you to follow your curiosity this year. Ask “What if…?” Take a course that you might not have considered at first glance. Consider and challenge the ideas of your peers. Seek out the expertise of our talented faculty. Enjoy the discussions in your classes and take advantage of the moments outside the classroom.

SERVE TOGETHER
Even as we learn together, we serve together, investing our skills and knowledge in each other and in our community. Giving back is an important part of the Wake Forest experience. Perhaps that means you will feed others through Campus Kitchen, or maybe you will fight for a more just world through community engagement opportunities. Your service might take you across campus, across town or across the globe.

LIVE LIFE TOGETHER
Another part of the Wake Forest experience is simply living life together. Spend a Saturday with your roommates at BB&T Field cheering on the Demon Deacons. Celebrate our victories by rolling the Quad. Meet a friend for a conversation over coffee. Exchange your favorite book recommendations. Attend the Lighting of the Quad and Lovefeast. One of the first opportunities to live life together comes today at “Arrive and Thrive” on Manchester Plaza, where we will encourage each other to seek holistic wellbeing.

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Allison McWilliams: New beginnings and letting go

Allison McWilliams, the Director of Career Education in the Wake Forest Office of Personal and Career Development on Monday, October 10, 2011.

Allison McWilliams, director of mentoring and alumni personal and career development in the Office of Personal and Career Development, will write occasional articles in 2015-2016 for Inside WFU. This is her first for the academic year. In each, she will share observations and suggestions with faculty and staff drawn from her professional experience with students.

The beginning of the school year can be an exciting time: new classes, new friends, and new opportunities allow each of us to “re-set,” as it were. It’s easy to think of any beginning in solely positive terms, but it’s important to remember that there can be anxiety associated, as well.

As William Bridges notes in his work on change, any transition, no matter how big or small, involves three stages. Endings require us to let go of what has become familiar and comfortable. The neutral zone, in between endings and beginnings, can be both freeing but also a little scary, as we are no longer tied down to anything. Finally, we reach a new beginning and must adapt to a new place.

Our process through these stages is deeply personal; while I may race through to get to a new beginning, you may hang out for a bit in the neutral zone, resisting the urge to adopt and conform to new rules, while someone else is clinging for dear life to that ending, not wanting to let go.

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The Satellite Program – Let’s All be Winners

By Christy Lennon, senior HR Partner

(Christy Lennon recently penned this article for another outlet about “Project Dream,” which started in 1999 and continues to find success, providing work experience for a special group of students.)

When I was first approached about the “Project Dream” program in 1999, I was fascinated by the concept. The idea was to place high school students in the “Occupational Course of Study Programs” in either unpaid or paid positions on a college campus so they could obtain “real world” work experience while also receiving credit hours towards a high school diploma. I thought to myself, “How can I make this work?”

Beth Ritchie, community-based training coordinator, and Sandra Courtner, job coach for the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools system, were not shy in asking me to do just that for a program still in its infancy. At that time I was manager of Human Resources for the Graylyn Conference Center. We were certainly on a tight financial budget, as many businesses were, but I wanted to learn more.

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What to do in Winston-Salem? Try a Segway tour

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A guest post by Bonnie Davis — associate director, Wake Forest News and Communications

Who knew that being a tourist in your own city could be so much fun? Recently, my husband, Mike Pollard, and I embarked on a Segway tour through downtown Winston-Salem.

I didn’t even know these tours existed until a few weeks ago. In fact, there are two companies in town that offer tours – Revolution Gliding Tours and Triad Eco Adventures. They apparently both opened two years ago.

Admittedly, the main draw was cruising on a Segway, but we also got to see our city in a different way and learned a lot. The biggest takeaways? Segways are cool and easy to ride once you get the hang of it, and downtown is booming and bustling, thanks mostly, in my opinion (and the tour guide’s), to the energy and growth spawning from the Wake Forest Innovation Quarter.

From ghosts to interesting architectural features of downtown buildings, to the beautiful new Bailey Park and the Strollway greenway, there was a lot to see and learn. I’ll definitely do this again, and it would be a fun way to entertain out-of-town guests as well.

WakeUnited: Live United Ryan Janvion

Janvion.Ryan.300x175Ryan Janvion, a business enterprise management major from Miami, Fla., is deeply involved at Wake Forest because he wants to make a difference.

Janvion, a member of the Wake Forest football team, is active in Athletes in Action and the Student Athlete Advisory Committee, which often participates in community service events.

“Some of my activities include speaking at different schools around Winston-Salem to encourage students to chase their dreams and rise up to the challenges they will face throughout their journeys,” says Janvion. “I have a tremendous amount of respect for the United Way and believe what it does for the community really has an impact on many lives for the better.”

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Fresh Food Network delivers local foods to campus

freshfoodnetworkGuest post by junior Jake Teitelbaum

Do you ever wish you could buy more local produce, meats or dairy, but simply don’t have time to make it to the farmer’s market?

Fresh Food Network, launched last semester, is an entirely student run e-commerce venture making it easier for members of the Wake Forest community to buy local and organic foods.

To purchase items, visit www.FreshFN.com to see what’s fresh around town and place your order anytime from Sunday evening through Thursday at 10 p.m. Choose whether you will pick up your order on Thursday or Friday (Note: Orders placed after Wednesday at 5 p.m. will be available for pick up on Friday).

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WakeUnited: Live United Matt Williams

matt.williams.300x175OPCD’s associate director for marketing and communications, Matt Williams, is a graduate of Project Blueprint, a leadership development program sponsored by the United Way that increases the participation of individuals from under-represented groups on nonprofit and community boards. Participants receive training and support to drive change in these organizations where diverse perspectives and experiences are needed and valued.

“I graduated from Project Blueprint in 2012 and found it incredibly helpful,” says Williams. “I received instruction on strategic and financial planning, diversity and inclusion, operational processes and more. The experience introduced me to other citizens seeking to use their strengths to serve and familiarized me with organizations working to eradicate many challenges within our community.”

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Giving thanks every day, not just on Thanksgiving

richwine.175x275A guest post by Jennifer Richwine, University Advancement’s executive director of the Washington, D.C., office.

Thank you notes were non-negotiable in my house growing up. My mother was a stickler on writing thank you notes when we received gifts for birthdays or holidays, and often we weren’t even allowed to enjoy the gift until the thank you note was written, stamped and in the mail. Like most children, I balked at the idea and hated trying to come up with the right thing to say.

As an adult I moved into my first job, my first apartment, my first time truly on my own and became more disconnected from the people who had always been so prevalent in my life. I realized how much I missed these friends and family and wondered if they understood just how important they were to me.

With Gratitude

  • Jennifer Richwine’s “With Gratitude: The Power of the Thank You Note” is available on Amazon, which recently named it the number one new release in business etiquette. It was published through CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform with help from Wake Forest’s digital publishing expert Bill Kane. The book is also available as e-book through Wake Forest Digital Publishing.

So one Thanksgiving, I decided to make a list of the people who had been important influences in my life over the past year, and I proceeded to write thank you notes to every single person on that list, thanking them for a kindness, a friendship, a piece of well-timed advice. And as I wrote, I began to feel like I was bursting with joy for all of these people I had in my life. I never realized just how fortunate I was until I actually put onto paper and into words why I was thankful for them.

As the notes began arriving in mailboxes, my phone started ringing. Friends and colleagues and family were delighted, surprised, thankful themselves, to receive my notes of thanksgiving. Common phrases were “I didn’t know it meant so much to you,” or “I can’t believe you took the time to write that,” or “I’ve never been thanked for just being me before.” It quickly became clear that something special was happening.

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Open access: What is it? Why do we need it?

molly.keener.300x175By Sara Hendricks, Wake Forest News Office intern

Access to scholarship has traditionally been reserved for those who subscribe to academic journals or those who attend or work at an institution with subscriptions. A personal subscription can cost upwards of $1,000 per year. Library subscriptions run much higher, with ZSR’s most expensive journals costing tens of thousands of dollars.

But what if academic research could become more accessible, more immediate and less impenetrable? This is the goal of the open access movement, which aims to provide “free, immediate, online availability of research articles, coupled with the rights to use these articles fully in the digital environment,” according to the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition.

Learn more about open access

In 2010, the Z. Smith Reynolds Library Librarians’ Assembly adopted an open access policy. However, it applies only to library faculty scholarship, not all faculty scholarship, so there’s room to grow.

Misperceptions that publishing in an open access journal is less prestigious than publishing in a traditional journal abound, but Scholarly Communication Librarian Molly Keener says some of the most respected journals are published open access.

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