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Faculty News

Proposals funded in CNS, CSC, HES, HST, and PHY

Clarke

Clarke

Congratulations to Philip Clarke, assistant professor of counseling, whose proposal entitled “Care Train Project” has been funded by the Wake Forest University Health Sciences.

Hellyer

Hellyer

Congratulations to Robert Hellyer, associate professor of history, whose proposal entitled “The Civil Wars of Japan’s Meiji Restoration and National Reconciliation Global Historical Perspectives” has been funded by the Japan Foundation.

Kim-Shapiro

Kim-Shapiro

Congratulations to Daniel B. Kim-Shapiro, professor physics, whose proposal entitled “Antidote for inhaled CO poisoning based on mutationally engineered neuroglobin” has been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under award number 1R01HL125886-01 and by [subaward/subcontract from] University of Pittsburgh (WFU funding agency).

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Innovative teaching leads to new Winston-Salem music festival

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By Madeline Stone, Wake Forest news office intern

He wanted to put on a rock show. They wanted to learn entrepreneurial skills for the real world. Assistant professor of practice Len Neighbors decided to combine the two and have the students in his Arts Entrepreneurship class build a music festival from the ground up.

Offered as a year-long class that focuses on both communication and entrepreneurship, Len’s students have been meeting once a week since August to plan a music festival that both Wake Forest and Winston-Salem can enjoy. Under Neighbors’ guidance, students have done everything from branding the festival to promoting it to booking acts and venues.

In this Q&A, Neighbors talks about the birth of DashPop and how he made the idea fit with his academic goals.

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Creative teaching in biology class includes a ‘pool quiz’

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAUsually, taking a quiz requires paper and pencil. For biology course 311 and 312, snorkels and bathing suits were also in order.

Graduate student Ben Perlman, who co-teaches the sections on Ecology and Conservation of Coral Reefs with biology professors Miriam Ashley-Ross and Miles Silman, has been giving the “pool quiz” the past three years to prepare students for an annual spring break study trip to Belize and the lighthouse reef atoll located off its coast.

“I do this to help get my students prepared for all the different fishes and corals we’re going to see in the wild,” he said. “It’s a really fun activity just to get them used to their snorkel gear, and, for some students, it’s their first time snorkeling so it gives them practice.”

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BCBSNC seed grants support health, wellness research across campus

Wake Forest University’s associate provost of research has announced the faculty recipients of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina (BCBSNC) seed grants to support research on health and wellbeing.

“The research being supported with these grants has sustainability potential and will have a great impact on many people’s lives,” said Bruce King, associate provost of research at the university.

Last year, BCBSNC partnered with Wake Forest University to create a model for health and wellbeing that included seed money for faculty research in these areas. Four grants, for $50,000 each, were awarded to Mark Jensen, School of Divinity; Mark Hall, School of Law; Jeff Katula, Health and Exercise Science; and Christine Soriano, Theater and Dance.

Additionally, the initial BCBSNC gift supports the transformation of Reynolds Gym into a comprehensive center for wellbeing, has funded a new director of wellbeing position and will support Wake Forest’s approach to wellbeing across eight dimensions – physical, emotional, spiritual, social, intellectual, financial, occupational, and environmental – under the Thrive umbrella.

The seed money will support the following research projects:

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Proposals funded: Carroll, Messier, Silman, Zanish-Belcher

Congratulations to David Carroll, professor of physics, whose proposal entitled “Ljus Magna Development” and “Ljus OLEV Development” has been funded by the Ljus, Inc.

Congratulations to Stephen Messier, professor health & exercise science, whose proposal entitled “The Runner’s and Injury Longitudinal Study (TRAILS): Injury Recover Supplemental” has been funded by the US Department of Defense.

Congratulations to Miles Silman, professor of biology, whose proposal entitled “Ecosystem effects and carbon content of Amazonian bamboo-dominated forests” has been funded by the NASA.

Congratulations to Tanya Zanish-Belcher, director of special collection/archivist, whose proposal entitled “Preservation Assistance Grants for Smaller Institutions” has been funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).

Faculty publications: January and February 2015 publications

Crainshaw, Jill Y. (Divinity). They Spin with Their Hands: Women’s Ordination Rites: Renewing God’s Story with God’s People. CreateSpace Independent Publishing. February 2015.

Cunningham, Patricia M., & Richard L. Allington. (Education). Classrooms That Work: They Can All Read and Write, 6th ed. Pearson. February 2015.

Warren, Carl S., James M. Reeve, & Jonathan Duchac. (Business). Accounting, 26th ed. Cengage Learning. January 2015.

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Ebola symposium sheds light, shares faculty expertise

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The symposium, Ebola: At Home and Abroad, held Feb. 12-13 demonstrated the importance of a liberal arts education. Even though Ebola is a virus, attendees learned that to effectively respond to the outbreak requires knowledge of history, economics, law, bioethics, as well as biology, medicine and other disciplines. Prior to the symposium, associate teaching professor Pat Lord’s virology students studied the Ebola virus to prepare background knowledge and a quiz made available online.

On the first night of the symposium, with more than 125 undergraduate, graduate, and medical students, professors, staff, and community members present, Assistant Professor of History Nate Plageman began by challenging everyone to stop thinking of Africa as “one-dimensional.” He highlighted assumptions about race that permeated Ebola news coverage.

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History class collaborates with Project Re-entry for art exhibit

blee23“Release: From Stigma to Acceptance,” which opened on Saturday, Jan. 17 at the Sawtooth School for Visual Art in Winston-Salem, features the words and art of formerly incarcerated offenders and was a collaboration between Project Re-entry of the Piedmont Triad Regional Council and students in Lisa Blee’s public history course.

Project Re-Entry assists former offenders throughout various stages of the criminal justice process — offering programs designed to meet the needs of individuals re-adapting to life following a prison sentence.

The exhibit runs at the Sawtooth School through Feb. 28. It then moves to Wake Forest University from March 20 through May 1 and opens at the Project Re-entry Goodwill Office on May 4.

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Montague recognized for auditing research

MontagueNAssistant Professor of Accounting Norma Montague has received the Best Paper Award from Auditing: A Journal of Practice and Theory (AJPT).

“I was delighted to learn of this award. Norma Montague epitomizes for me the Wake Forest Teacher-Scholar ideal,” said Jack Wilkerson, senior associate dean of accounting programs and professor of accountancy. “She balances excellent classroom instruction on the one hand with excellent scholarship, as evidenced by this award from the most prestigious auditing journal in the U.S.”

The paper is titled “The Audit of Fair Values and Other Estimates: The Effects of Underlying Environmental, Task and Auditor-Specific Factors” and was co-authored with Brian Batten (University of Kentucky), Lisa Gaynor (University of South Florida), Linda McDaniel (University of Kentucky) and Gregory Sierra (Southern Illinois University Edwardsville.)

The Auditing Section of the American Accounting Association established this award to annual recognize a paper published in the AJPT that has had a significant influence on or the potential to significantly influence auditing research or practice. The award was given on January 16, 2015.

Montague’s research primarily focuses on auditing with a behavioral and decision making focus. She’s interested in how auditors makes decisions and judgments as professional standards and reporting requirements evolve.

WakeUnited: Live United Roger Beahm

beahm.250x300After 15 years as a United Way volunteer, Roger Beahm, professor of practice in marketing at the School of Business, is vice chair of the WakeUnited campaign for 2015.

Beahm first became involved by serving as a volunteer on the marketing committee for United Way of Forsyth County, subsequently served on the executive board of United Way of Guilford County and for nine years was a member of the board of directors of United Way of North Carolina.

“I first got involved with United Way because the company where I began my career (Procter & Gamble) believed in the United Way and its mission,” says Beahm. “I feel the most important thing United Way does is bring positive change to people’s lives through programs that touch our community in the three most critical areas: education, financial stability and healthy lives.”

Beahm says people contribute to the United Way for three reasons:

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