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Faculty News

Proposals funded: Kim-Shapiro, Masicampo, Mewhinney

Congratulations to Daniel Kim-Shapiro, professor of physics, whose proposal entitled “Storage lesion in banked blood due to disruption of nitric oxide homeostasis” has been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under award number 5R01HL098032-07 and by [subaward/subcontract from] University of Pittsburgh (WFU funding agency).

Congratulations to E.J. Masicampo, assistant professor of psychology, whose proposal “Complementary Benefits of First- and Third-Person Perspective for Self-Control” has been funded by the Templeton Foundation and by [subaward/subcontract from] FSU Research Foundation, Inc. (WFU funding agency).

Congratulations to Kate Mewhinney, clinical professor at the School of Law: Elder Clinic, whose proposal entitled “Health Rights of LBGT Patients” has been funded by the NC Society of Health Care Attorneys.

Messier receives $6 million research grant

A $6 million federal grant, the largest ever awarded to Wake Forest, will enable health and exercise science researchers to further study knee osteoarthritis and successful treatment measures in community-based settings.

Wake Forest Heath and Exercise Science faculty involved in the IDEA study, Steve Messier (in white), Gary Miller, and Shannon Mihalko, in the Biomechanics laboratory in Reynolds Gym on Tuesday, September 24, 2013.

Wake Forest Heath and Exercise Science faculty involved in the IDEA study, Steve Messier (in white), Gary Miller, and Shannon Mihalko, in the Biomechanics laboratory in Reynolds Gym on Tuesday, September 24, 2013.

Health and exercise science professor Steve Messier and colleagues have spent 26 of the last 34 years at Wake Forest studying the effects of exercise and dietary restriction related to knee osteoarthritis (OA) through clinical trials research. This new grant will fund a study known as WE-CAN – Weight Loss and Exercise for Communities with Arthritis in North Carolina – that will put these years of highly-controlled clinical study results to the test in a real-world setting.

“Knee osteoarthritis is a leading cause of disability in older adults and there are over 250 million people in the world affected,” Messier said. “Our work has looked at effects of walking, strength training and weight loss on function and pain in OA under very controlled settings. We’ve decided to take what we’ve learned before and move it out in the community.”

Armed with the grant from the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), Messier and his team, which includes professor Gary Miller, a nutrition expert, and associate professor and health psychologist Shannon Mihalko, both of the Health and Exercise Science department, are conducting what’s known as a pragmatic clinical trial in which there are very few controls in order to simulate normal clinical conditions.

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Morosini presented award in Italy

 

Roberta Morosini, professor of Romance languages, received the Luigi De Lise Culture Award for 2015 in a Sept. 6 ceremony in Italy.  She is in Italy this fall for a sabbatical.

The award is named in honor of a playwright from Sarno, Italy, Morosini’s hometown.

 

 

Faculty offer workshops on preparing for tests

Science faculty and the Learning Assistance Center (LAC) are collaborating this fall to help first-year students deal with exam panic through a three-part workshop, “How to prevent a panic attack on your first college science exam.”

Michael Shuman, interim director, and Shelly Cardi, staff psychologist, of LAC, as well as Pat Lord, director of Health Professions Program and associate teaching professor of biology, and David Wren, assistant teaching professor and director of the Chemistry Center, have planned the workshops to help first-year students prepare for their first college science exam.

Wren described the LAC as the “emergency department” for students where triage takes place to help deal with test anxiety. He and his colleagues believe a pre-emptive strike like these workshops will be more effective in the long run.

“All of us have had experience with students not knowing how to study, how to prepare, how to take the exam – and not panic – or how to analyze how they performed,” said Lord. “We’ve got some amazing things planned to help our students learn and do their best and we guarantee they will learn at least one technique that will help them improve their study skills.”

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Professors Kelton and Yang recognized for accounting research

Kelton-Yang-award-8-11-15

Andrea Kelton, left, Ya-wen Yang

School of Business accounting faculty Andrea Kelton and Ya-wen Yang received the 2015 Accounting Information Systems Notable Contributions to the Literature Award.

The award was presented Aug. 11 during the American Accounting Association annual meeting in Chicago. The award recognizes a paper published prior to Dec. 31, 2013 ,that has had a significant impact on accounting information systems research, theory, or practice.

Kelton and Yang’s paper, “The Impact of Corporate Governance on Internet Financial Reporting,” was published in the Journal of Accounting and Public Policy in 2008. The research examined why firms make the choice to take the extra steps to engage in Internet Financial Reporting (IFR) – a voluntary disclosure.

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Michelle Voss Roberts wins Award for Excellence for book

The American Academy of Religion (AAR) has selected Michelle Voss Roberts of the School of Divinity as one of its 2015 recipients of the Awards for Excellence in the Study of Religion.  She is associate dean for academic affairs and associate professor of theology in the School.

Michelle Voss Roberts

Michelle Voss Roberts

In particular, she was selected for the Award for Excellence in the Study of Religion: Constructive-Reflective Studies.  The award recognizes her book, “Tastes of the Divine: Hindu and Christian Theologies of Emotion.”

The Awards for Excellence recognize new scholarly publications that make significant contributions to the study of religion. The awards honor books of distinctive originality, intelligence, creativity and importance; books that affect decisively how religion is examined, understood, and interpreted. For more information, see https://www.aarweb.org/programs-services/book-awards.

Awards will be presented at the AAR’s 2015 Annual Meeting in Atlanta on Nov. 22.

Founded in 1909, the American Academy of Religion is the world’s largest association of religion scholars, and its mission is to foster excellence in the study of religion by promoting research, publishing, and teaching about religion in academia. As a learned society and professional association of teachers and research scholars, the American Academy of Religion has about 9,000 members who teach in some 900 colleges, universities, seminaries, and schools in North America and abroad.

The Academy is dedicated to furthering knowledge of religion and religious institutions in all their forms and manifestations. This is accomplished through Academy-wide and regional conferences and meetings, publications, programs, and membership services.

ZSR Library Associate Dean Wanda Brown wins award

20738597059_477033abed_zCongratulations to ZSR Library Associate Dean Wanda Brown, who was recently presented the Demco/Black Caucus 2015 Award for Excellence in Librarianship.

This is an annual award of a framed print and a cash award made possible by a grant from DEMCO, Inc. of Madison, Wisconsin, and presented to the librarian who has made significant contributions to promoting the status of African Americans in the library profession. Specific contributions may include, but are not limited to, research and scholarship, recruitment, professional development, planning or implementation of programs, or advocacy (public relations).

Matthew Phillips named Charles M. Hewitt Master Teacher

Phillips-Master-Teacher-8-11-15Wake Forest University School of Business faculty member Matthew Phillips has been named the Charles M. Hewitt Master Teacher by the Academy of Legal Studies in Business (ALSB), the international organization of professors who teach law in business schools.

Phillips, a professor of practice in business law and ethics, teaches across the School’s undergraduate and graduate programs. He is also associate dean of the working professional MBA programs and Bern Beatty Fellow.

“I was excited about the opportunity to show my business law colleagues some of the exciting work we’re doing at Wake Forest,” Phillips said. “Any award is humbling, but it’s a special honor to be recognized by colleagues from across the country.”

The annual award recognizes faculty members who incorporate new subject matter, cultural shifts and advances in pedagogy and technology into their courses. The ALSB advances legal studies in business education and is the professional home for approximately 1,000 legal studies researchers and educators.

Named one of four finalists in the spring, Phillips presented his proposal, “Legal Analysis in Context for Managers,” at the ALSB annual meeting in Philadelphia on Aug. 10. His session used a case about accommodation of religious practice in employment to help undergraduate students learn how to do legal analysis.

“We start with an exercise in which students present the legal arguments for being allowed to delay a business law test if their roommate is sick based on a couple of ‘case precedents,’” Phillips explained. “Once we established the function and importance of legal analysis, we shift to the employment case. This is a way of doing two very different things – exploring practical competence in legal analysis and conceptual knowledge about employment discrimination – at the same time.”

Phillips received undergraduate and law degrees from Wake Forest and a Master of Divinity degree from Duke University. He is admitted to practice law before state and federal courts of North Carolina, the United States Tax Court and the United States Supreme Court. As an instrument-rated pilot, Phillips enjoys flying single-engine planes, and he is a pilot and legal officer in the Civil Air Patrol (the U.S. Air Force Auxiliary).

Proposals funded: Comstock-Ferguson, Smith, Zanish-Belcher

Congratulations to Lindsay Comstock-Ferguson, associate professor of chemistry, whose proposal entitled “RNA modification and antibiotic resistance” has been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under the award number 2R01A1088025-06 and by [subaward/subcontract from] Emory University (WFU funding agency).

Congratulations to William Smith, Babcock professor of botany in biology, whose proposal entitled “Using elevational treelines to predict climate change effects on the future size and distribution of mountain forests” has been funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Congratulations to Tanya Zanish-Belcher, director of special collections and archives at Z.Smith Reynolds Library, whose proposal entitled “EZ Digitization Grant: Digitizing Archival Materials from the NC Baptist Historic-Collection” has been funded by the Institute of Museum & Library Services (IMLS) and the State Library of North Carolina (WFU funding agency).

August 2015 faculty milestones

See a list of faculty milestones for August 2015:

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