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Wake Forest news for faculty and staff

Faculty News

October 2016 staff and faculty milestones

See a list of staff and faculty milestones in October 2016:

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Comings and goings for October 2016

See a list of employees joining and leaving the University in October 2016:

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Proposals funded: Kugler, Nixon, O’Day, Plemmons

Congratulations to Sara Kugler, director of external partnerships & initiatives at the Anna Julia Cooper Center, whose proposal entitled “Collaborative Research: AGEP Transformation Alliance: Bridging the PhD to Postdoc to Faculty Transitions for Women of Color in STEM” has been funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Congratulations to Pat Nixon, professor of health and exercise science, whose proposal entitled “Pre-natal Events, Post-natal Consequences II (Competitive Renewal)” has been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and by [subaward/subcontract from] Wake Forest University Health Sciences (WFU funding agency).

Congratulations to Gail O’Day, dean and professor of the School of Divinity, whose proposal entitled “Financial Well-Being for Pastoral Leaders” has been funded by the Lilly Endowment.

Congratulations to Bob Plemmons, professor of mathematics and statistics, whose proposal entitled “Innovations in Statistical Image Analysis and Applications to 3D Imaging for Improved SSA” has been funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) and by [subaward/subcontract from] University of New Mexico (WFU funding agency).

Wake Forest experts weigh in on Election Day with news media

During this election cycle, several Wake Forest faculty and staff have shared their expertise and insights with a variety of broadcast, print and online media outlets from the local level to international.

Today, on Election Day, you can catch political science professor John Dinan live on Fox News’ Happening Now show at 1 p.m. Dinan has been a frequent resource for reporters to explain why North Carolina has been such a battleground state, especially for the senate and gubernatorial races. And tonight, Dinan will join WXII in the studio for the evening newscasts at 5 p.m., 6 p.m., 10 p.m. and 11 p.m. to talk about election returns.

Communication professor Allan Louden joins WSJS radio at 7:36 p.m. to talk about political campaigns.

LGBTQ Center Director Angela Mazaris will be interviewed on WFDD radio at 9:35 p.m. about House Bill 2 and its impact on the governor’s race.

To see other election experts, check out this expert site at Wake Forest News.

Presidential Chairs support, retain outstanding faculty

A Wake Forest Presidential Chair supports recruiting and retaining faculty who are both outstanding researchers in their field as well as dedicated teachers.

President Nathan Hatch announced the Presidential Chair initiative in 2012 – an initiative made possible through Wake Will: The Campaign for Wake Forest. The initial goal to establish 10 chairs has been met.

“An endowed chair is an enduring tribute to the person who established it and is the highest academic award that can be bestowed on a faculty member,” Hatch said. “Our Presidential Chair program seeks to reward, retain and recruit those teacher-scholars who most embody the ideals that Wake Forest has for faculty: brilliant and committed scholars who have a profound ability and commitment to teach and mentor students.”

For the first $1 million donated to each Presidential Chair, the University matches those funds to provide additional support for faculty. Four of the 10 chairs have been named to faculty.

  • The Rubin Chair of Jewish and Israeli Studies – established by Mike (MALS ’13) and Debbie (MAEd ’83, MALS ’05) Rubin of Winston-Salem. Debbie, a trustee, worked as a counselor in the University Counseling Center for several years; held by Professor Barry Trachtenberg, department of History.
  • The Andrew Sabin Family Foundation Presidential Chair in Conservation Biology – established through the family foundation of Wake Forest parent Andrew Sabin (P ‘17) to support environmental programs around the world; held by Professor Miles Silman, department of Biology.
  • The Thomas W. Smith Foundation Presidential Chair in Business Ethics – supports a faculty member committed to the exploration of the relationship between business, government and society; held by Jim Otteson, executive director of the BB&T Center for the Study of Capitalism, School of Business.
  • The Inmar Presidential Chair of Analytics at the School of Business – established by the Winston-Salem-based company that is known for operating intelligent commerce networks; held by Jeffrey Camm, Associate Dean of Business Analytics, School of Business
  • The Donna A. Boswell Presidential Chair of Health Care Innovation – established by Boswell (’72, MA ’74), a university trustee, to promote teaching and scholarship that fosters a more comprehensive understanding of the political and economic factors that promote innovation in health care and health care delivery.
  • The David C. Darnell Presidential Chair in Principled Leadership – established by Bank of America as a retirement gift to Darnell following a 36-year career.
  • The William T. Wilson, III, Presidential Chair for Business Law – established by Wilson, a 1980 law school graduate who is a local attorney best known for his work in commercial real estate.
  • The Katherine and Dickerson Wright Presidential Chair in Computer Science and Entrepreneurship – established by Wake Forest parents who were founding partners of the Office of Personal and Career Development. Kathy, a University Trustee, serves on the Wake Will Campaign CORE Committee and the Wake Will Campaign California Bay Area Regional Committee.
  • The Burchfield Presidential Chair of Political Economy – established by Bobby Burchfield (’76), a former vice chair of the board of trustees and a prominent Washington, D.C., attorney
  • The Larry J. and LeeAnn Merlo Presidential Chair for Communications and Entrepreneurship – established by the Merlos, Wake Forest parents. As president and CEO of CVS Health, Larry has taken strong steps in his organization’s commitment to public health.

Dean Franco named director of Humanities Institute

dean.franco.300x175Professor of English Dean J. Franco has been named director of the Wake Forest University Humanities Institute beginning January 2017. The Institute, which was established in 2010, supports humanities scholarship which draws on disciplines like philosophy, literature, religion, history, and other fields to interpret the human experience, understand our world, and engage the issues of our time.

In the past six years, nearly 200 College faculty from 35 departments and programs across the humanities, natural and social sciences, and the arts, and 30 faculty from law, medicine, divinity and business, have collaborated with the Institute — helping bring together top scholars and leaders to produce new scholarship, inspire new directions in teaching, and demonstrate how the humanities can inform and impact important issues of our time, such as:

  • Envisioning a community that protects the world’s citizens from the effects of climate change — especially the poorest countries and communities.
  • Addressing the challenges of mass incarceration and the criminal justice system.
  • Recognizing the importance of humanities training for the future of medicine and exploring holistic healing through storytelling and narrative medicine.

Franco along with Mary Foskett, Wake Forest Kahle Professor of Religious Studies; Sally Barbour, professor of Romance Languages; and David Phillips, associate professor of Interdisciplinary Humanities — laid the groundwork and secured the funding that made the Institute possible.

“Having played a leading role in the Humanities Institute since its inception, Dean is perfectly poised to become the Institute’s next director,” said Foskett, the Humanities Institute founding director. “He will not only carry on its mission, which he helped craft, he will infuse the Institute with his unique combination of brilliance, creativity, vision, and energy. I can’t wait to see what the Humanities Institute will do with Dean leading it forward.”

The Institute has also supported transformational programming in the College such as the Interdisciplinary Humanities Pathway to Medicine Program, which offers guaranteed admission to Wake Forest School of Medicine for up to five undergraduates majoring in the humanities or fine arts, and new interdisciplinary initiatives like a growing digital humanities community at Wake Forest.

Wake Forest was recently awarded a $650,000 grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation in support of engaged humanities – teaching, learning, mentoring and real-world problem solving that moves beyond the classroom. With support from this grant, the Humanities Institute will offer new programming in narrative medicine and will collaborate with Reynolda House Museum of American Art to host new scholarly conferences.

“I am excited about working with Reynolda House to implement the Mellon Grant funded Reynolda Conferences in 2018 and 2019,” Franco said. “This is a dream scenario — the opportunity to assemble scholars working on the same sets of questions for extended, deep learning.”

Franco joined Wake Forest 2001. He directs the Jewish Studies minor, has recently served as associate chair of the English department, and was the Scott Family Faculty Fellow from 2012-2014. He researches and publishes on race and literature.

Read more…

Humanities Institute established

Humanities Institute lands 500K grant

Humanities Institute receives $1 million donation

 

Proposals funded: Lachgar, Mihalko, Silman, Williams

Congratulations to Abdessadek Lachgar, professor of chemistry, whose proposal entitled “Empowering Pakistani Women through Scientific Research, Technology Development, and Entrepreneurship: Waste-to-Energy Technology Development” has been funded by the USAID and by [subaward/subcontract from] National Academy of Sciences (WFU funding agency).

 

Congratulations to Shannon Mihalko, associate professor of health and exercise science, whose proposal entitled “Understanding and Predicting Fatigue, CV Decline and Events After Breast Cancer Treatment” has been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and by [subaward/subcontract from] Wake Forest University Health Sciences (WFU funding agency).

 

Congratulations to Miles Silman, professor of biology, whose proposal entitled “FESD Type 1: The Dynamics of Mountains, Landscape, and Climate in the Distribution and Generation of Biodiversity in the Amazon/Andean Forest” has been funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and by [subaward/subcontract from] Duke University (WFU funding agency).

 

Congratulations to Richard T. Williams, professor of physics, whose proposal entitled “Collaborative Research: ARI-MA: Realizing High Performance Inorganic Scintillators at Low Cost” has been funded by the US Department of Homeland Security.

Faculty publications: September 2016 updates

Chapman, Gary, & Shannon Warden. (Counseling). Things I Wish I’d Known Before We Became Parents. Northfield Publishing. September 2016.

Pinder, Jonathan P. (Business). Introduction to Business Analytics Using Simulation. Academic Press. September 2016.

Voss Roberts, Michelle, Ed. (Divinity). Comparing Faithfully: Insights for Systematic Theological Reflection. Fordham University Press. September 2016.

Wake Forest Magazine’s Maria Henson speaks at Pulitzer event

Wake Forest University opens the Words Awake! conference, in which alumni writers return to campus to talk about their craft, with a reception at the Byrum Welcome Center on Friday, March 23, 2012. Magazine editor Maria Henson.

Wake Forest Magazine editor-at-large, journalism lecturer and associate vice president Maria Henson (’82) recently spoke at the Pulitzer Centennial Celebration at Harvard University (video).

Henson is Wake Forest’s only Pulitzer Prize winner. She won in 1992 for a series of investigative editorials on domestic violence while at the Lexington Herald-Leader (Ky.). In 2005, she edited a series on Yosemite National Park in The Sacramento Bee (Ca.) that won for editorial writing. In 1993-94, Henson was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard.

In a powerful 11-minute speech before more than 1,000 people, she recalled the impact of “To Have and to Harm,” a yearlong series of 30 editorials that made recommendations for improved response and protections for battered women in Kentucky. In 1992, the Kentucky state legislature passed every aspect of domestic violence reform the Lexington Herald-Leader editorial board recommended and the courts changed their practices as well.

“All these years later, at a time of such discouragement and disenchantment over our public life, I look back and remember the power of the press and ordinary citizens to effect change – both of them out of a love of community and a passion for fairness. And all these years later, I have not given up on what is possible,” Henson said.

Henson was inducted into the Wake Forest University Writers Hall of Fame this year, in conjunction with Words Awake 2! Read an Inside WFU interview with her commemorating that occasion.

Hall appointed at the Brookings Institution

Wake Forest School of Law professor Mark Hall poses in the law library on Tuesday, May 3, 2016.

This is a guest post from the School of Law:

Wake Forest Law Professor Mark Hall, the director of the law school’s Health Law and Policy Program, has been appointed as the only Nonresident Senior Fellow in the Center for Health Policy at the Brookings Institution, part of the Washington, D.C.-based think tank’s Economic Studies research program.

“At great law schools, faculty work to solve some of society’s most vexing problems. The Brookings Institution has recognized Mark Hall as a major contributor in his fields of expertise,” Professor Hall’s appointment letter states.

The Brookings Institution is the No. 1 think tank in the U.S in the annual think tank index published by Foreign Policy and No. 1 in the world in the Global Go To Think Tank.

Of the 200 most prominent think tanks in the U.S., the Brookings Institution’s research is the most widely cited by the media, Hall says.

One of Washington’s oldest think tanks, Brookings conducts research and education in the social sciences, primarily in economics, metropolitan policy, governance, foreign policy, and global economy and development, according to its website. Its stated mission is to “provide innovative and practical recommendations that advance three broad goals: strengthen American democracy; foster the economic and social welfare, security and opportunity of all Americans; and secure a more open, safe, prosperous, and cooperative international system.”

Brookings has five research programs at its Washington, D.C., campus (Economic Studies, Foreign Policy, Governance Studies, Global Economy and Development and Metropolitan Policy)as well as three international centers based in Doha, Qatar (Brookings Doha Center), Beijing, China (Brookings-Tsinghua Center for Public Policy) and New Delhi, India (Brookings India).