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Wake Forest news for faculty and staff

Faculty News

ZSR Library Associate Dean Wanda Brown wins award

20738597059_477033abed_zCongratulations to ZSR Library Associate Dean Wanda Brown, who was recently presented the Demco/Black Caucus 2015 Award for Excellence in Librarianship.

This is an annual award of a framed print and a cash award made possible by a grant from DEMCO, Inc. of Madison, Wisconsin, and presented to the librarian who has made significant contributions to promoting the status of African Americans in the library profession. Specific contributions may include, but are not limited to, research and scholarship, recruitment, professional development, planning or implementation of programs, or advocacy (public relations).

Matthew Phillips named Charles M. Hewitt Master Teacher

Phillips-Master-Teacher-8-11-15Wake Forest University School of Business faculty member Matthew Phillips has been named the Charles M. Hewitt Master Teacher by the Academy of Legal Studies in Business (ALSB), the international organization of professors who teach law in business schools.

Phillips, a professor of practice in business law and ethics, teaches across the School’s undergraduate and graduate programs. He is also associate dean of the working professional MBA programs and Bern Beatty Fellow.

“I was excited about the opportunity to show my business law colleagues some of the exciting work we’re doing at Wake Forest,” Phillips said. “Any award is humbling, but it’s a special honor to be recognized by colleagues from across the country.”

The annual award recognizes faculty members who incorporate new subject matter, cultural shifts and advances in pedagogy and technology into their courses. The ALSB advances legal studies in business education and is the professional home for approximately 1,000 legal studies researchers and educators.

Named one of four finalists in the spring, Phillips presented his proposal, “Legal Analysis in Context for Managers,” at the ALSB annual meeting in Philadelphia on Aug. 10. His session used a case about accommodation of religious practice in employment to help undergraduate students learn how to do legal analysis.

“We start with an exercise in which students present the legal arguments for being allowed to delay a business law test if their roommate is sick based on a couple of ‘case precedents,’” Phillips explained. “Once we established the function and importance of legal analysis, we shift to the employment case. This is a way of doing two very different things – exploring practical competence in legal analysis and conceptual knowledge about employment discrimination – at the same time.”

Phillips received undergraduate and law degrees from Wake Forest and a Master of Divinity degree from Duke University. He is admitted to practice law before state and federal courts of North Carolina, the United States Tax Court and the United States Supreme Court. As an instrument-rated pilot, Phillips enjoys flying single-engine planes, and he is a pilot and legal officer in the Civil Air Patrol (the U.S. Air Force Auxiliary).

Proposals funded: Comstock-Ferguson, Smith, Zanish-Belcher

Congratulations to Lindsay Comstock-Ferguson, associate professor of chemistry, whose proposal entitled “RNA modification and antibiotic resistance” has been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under the award number 2R01A1088025-06 and by [subaward/subcontract from] Emory University (WFU funding agency).

Congratulations to William Smith, Babcock professor of botany in biology, whose proposal entitled “Using elevational treelines to predict climate change effects on the future size and distribution of mountain forests” has been funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Congratulations to Tanya Zanish-Belcher, director of special collections and archives at Z.Smith Reynolds Library, whose proposal entitled “EZ Digitization Grant: Digitizing Archival Materials from the NC Baptist Historic-Collection” has been funded by the Institute of Museum & Library Services (IMLS) and the State Library of North Carolina (WFU funding agency).

August 2015 faculty milestones

See a list of faculty milestones for August 2015:

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CRADLE program invests in faculty and grantsmanship

The Creative Research Activities Development and Enrichment (CRADLE) initiative is engaging with its fifth cohort of faculty this September and continues to experience interest and success.

The Office of the Provost and the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (ORSP) coordinate the program. CRADLE aims to develop competitive external proposals that support multiyear research projects and creative activities. Fellows receive assistance from both internal and external consultants to improve their grantsmanship and to articulate a five-year career plan that incorporates proven strategies for developing and funding superior research and creative activities.

“We began CRADLE because we wanted to help faculty develop competitive grant proposals,” said Lori Messer, director of ORSP.

On Sept. 18, the new cohort will attend the first of four seminars, “Winning Grants,” that will cover federal grants. In December, another seminar focused on foundation and corporate grants will be held. Other CRADLE sessions will focus on quality and team building. Participants also work one-on-one with a grants consultant to develop 90-day contracts that outline their grant plans.

The seminars are open to non-CRADLE participants.

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July 2015 faculty publications

20150323gillespie3262

 

 

Gillespie, Michele, & Sally G. McMillen, Eds. (History). North Carolina Women: Their Lives and Times (Southern Women: Their Lives and Times, Book 2). University of Georgia Press. July 2015.

Innovative solution for WFU blind student leads to journal article

Michael Shuman and Robert Erhardt recently published an article in the Journal of Statistics Education, “Assistive Technologies for Second-Year Statistics Students who are Blind.” The article written by Shuman, interim director of Wake Forest’s Learning Assistance Center (LAC) and Erhardt, assistant professor of mathematics, focuses on the technology they developed to assist Kathryn Webster, an aspiring mathematician who also happens to be blind.

Michael Shuman, associate director of the Wake Forest Learning Assistance Center, poses in the Z. Smith Reynolds Library on Thursday, August 18, 2011.

Shuman

Kathryn, a junior from Greenwich, Conn., enrolled in a course in statistics covering topics requiring her to both interpret and produce three sets of materials: mathematical writing, computer programming, and visual displays of data. While some resources for blind students taking mathematics courses or introductory statistics courses were available, none were adequate to assist Kathryn.

New Wake Forest faculty members pose for headshots during their orientation on Wednesday, August 8, 2012.  Robert Erhardt, Mathematics.

Erhardt

In addition to providing academic support to all Wake Forest students through coaching and peer tutoring, the LAC exists to enable students with disabilities to experience equal access to the academic, social, and recreational activities and programs at the University.

Though Wake Forest is a smaller institution than other similar private schools, the University still has a number of undergraduates with disabilities who request accommodations. Though Kathryn brought some of her own assistive technology with her to campus, Shuman was struggling with a novel way of representing visual data for her related to her math courses.

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‘Book club’ approach to first-year reading

The Wake Forest Summer Research Fellowship program allows undergraduate students to work with faculty mentors on research projects in their areas of interest.  Psychology professor Christy Buchanan works with psychology major Rebecca Abramson ('11) on a study of effective parenting techniques and how mothers perceive them. They talk about their research in Greene Hall on Thursday, July 22, 2010.

Christy Buchanan

Wake Forest took a “book club” approach to this year’s summer reading assignment for first-year students. From John Grisham’s “Gray Mountain” to Levitt and Dubner’s “Think Like a Freak,” to Susan Cain’s “Quiet,” incoming students can choose from 22 different books.

All of the books fit this year’s theme, “Exploring Difference, Embracing Diversity.” Contemporary novels, historical novels, non-fiction, and a collection of short stories made the list.

The Orientation and Lower Division Advising Committee originally planned to choose one common reading, but changed course when it received so many good recommendations from faculty members.

“Our committee asked the question, ‘Why do we have to pick just one?’” said Senior Associate Dean for Academic Advising Christy Buchanan.

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Proposals funded: Carroll, Silman, Walldorf

David Carroll

Carroll

Congratulations to Dave Carroll, professor of physics, whose proposal entitled “Partnership for Innovation: Accelerating Innovation Research – Technology Translation Graphenated-Carbon Nanotube (g-CNT) Composites for a Miniature, Fiber-Integrated Spectroscopy Light Source” has been funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and by [subaward/subcontract from] Duke University (WFU funding agency).

Miles Silman

Silman

 

Congratulations to Miles Silman, professor of biology, whose proposal entitled “Biochar production for tropical agriculture and carbon sequestration” has been funded by the Blue Moon Foundation.

 

Walldorf

Walldorf

Congratulations to Will Walldorf, associate professor of political science, whose proposal entitled “To Shape Our World for Good: Master Narratives and Patterns of Forceful Regime Change in United States Foreign Policy, 1900-2011” has been funded by the New City Commons Foundation.

Proposals funded: Anderson, Kim-Shapiro, Miller

Paul Anderson

Anderson

Congratulations to Paul Anderson, professor of physics, whose proposal entitled “Quantum effects for black holes and analog black holes and the validity of the semiclassical approximation when quantum effects are large” has been funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

 

 

Kim-Shapiro

Kim-Shapiro

 

Congratulations to Daniel B. Kim-Shapiro, professor of physics, whose proposal entitled “Effects of nitric oxide in sickle cell blood” has been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

 

 

Miller

Miller

Congratulations to Gary Miller, associate professor of health and exercise science, whose proposal entitled “Policy & environmental supports for healthy eating & exercise on college campuses” has been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and by [subaward/subcontract from] Gramercy Research Group (WFU funding agency).