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Faculty News

Harriger named director for Wake Washington program

Wake Forest political science professor Katy Harriger poses in her office in Tribble Hall on Friday, November 4, 2011.

Katy Harriger

Katy Harriger, professor and chair of politics and international affairs, has been named faculty director of Wake Forest’s new Wake Washington program, which will combine academic and internship experiences in the nation’s capital.

Scheduled to launch in fall 2017, the program will provide students with “outstanding opportunities to explore what it means to be a citizen, a policy maker, and a leader,” said Michele Gillespie, dean of the College.

As faculty director, Harriger will oversee the program and serve as the on-site faculty member for the first semester of the program.

“Katy Harriger is one of our very best teacher-scholars and the perfect person for this new role,” Gillespie said. “Her commitment to students, unwavering expectation of rigorous learning in and out of the classroom, important scholarship on American politics, and leadership abilities are all exceptional.”

Each year, Wake Forest will offer a fall and spring semester program. Modeled after Wake Forest’s study abroad centers in Venice, Vienna and London, the new program will offer close faculty-student engagement and high academic standards. A faculty member will take 16 undergraduate students with them to Washington and teach courses in their area of expertise capitalizing on learning experiences available there.

The first set of classes will include “U.S. Policymaking in the 21st Century” and “American Constitutional Law: Separation of Powers and Federalism,” taught by Harriger. They will include visits to Capitol Hill, the Supreme Court and the White House. Future semesters could focus on art, communication, science or other fields of study.  Go here for the full story.

Harris-Perry advances justice for women and girls of color

Wake Forest students and staff members in the Wake the Vote class pose for headshots on Tuesday, January 26, 2016. Professor Melissa Harris-Perry.

Melissa Harris-Perry, Maya Angelou Presidential Chair, spoke before the Congressional Caucus on Black Women and Girls April 28. The session allowed members of the Congressional Caucus on Black Women and Girls to explore the condition of black women in the United States through the testimony of black female academic, activists, celebrities and business women. Here is a link to the testimony she presented.

On April 29 and 30, Wake Forest’s Anna Julia Cooper Center – led by Harris-Perry – is hosting “Know Her Truths: Advancing Justice for Women & Girls of Color,” a national gathering focused on advancing justice for women and girls of color.

The conference is a key part of an ongoing, collaborative initiative to develop a meaningful research agenda addressing women and girls of color. The event will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Saturday, April 30 from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. in Benson University Center 401. Nearly 100 speakers and panelists representing more than 60 organizations and institutions will participate. The full agenda and list of speakers are available on the “Know Her Truths” website.

Watch the livestream of the conference here.

Harris-Perry has also been named a winner of the 2016 Hillman Prize for Broadcast Journalism. Since 1950, the Sidney Hillman Foundation has honored journalists who pursue investigative reporting and deep storytelling in service of the common good. Winners exemplify resourcefulness and courage in reporting, skilled storytelling, social impact and relevance to the ideals of Sidney Hillman.

She was recently named editor-at-large for Elle magazine.

Communication faculty participating in Great Strides

greatstrides

This is a guest post from the Department of Communication:

Department of Communication faculty are helping add tomorrows for the thousands of Americans living with cystic fibrosis by joining the department team to walk in the Great Strides Walk on campus Saturday, April 23, at 10 a.m. on Davis Field.

Last year, the team raised $2,500. Department Chairman Allan Louden with his dog, Glacier, as well as Ron Von Burg, Alessandra Von Burg, Ananda Mitra, and other faculty and students will participate in the walk.

The faculty and students are involved to support graduate student Michael White, according to Alessandra Von Burg.

“We are walking for Michael to give even more tomorrows for the moms, dads, sisters, brothers, daughters, sons, friends and co-workers who struggle every day just to breathe,” said Alessandra Von Burg. “Michael is a CF parent who is committed to showing his son that all lives matter and that there are countless people willing to support him and the thousands of others living with cystic fibrosis.”

1. Register to walk with the team at http://fightcf.cff.org/goto/WakeCommunication.

2. Donate to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation in a team member’s name athttp://fightcf.cff.org/goto/WakeCommunication or through a team member’s personal page (i.e.http://fightcf.cff.org/goto/WFUMichaelWhite). Donations are tax-deductible.

To learn more about CF and the CF Foundation, visit www.cff.org.

“This is a great opportunity for us to show support and solidarity with our campus and the broader Winston-Salem community. Please join us in our efforts to fight this devastating genetic disease!”

Proposals funded: Kim-Shapiro, Lee, Rejeski

Kim-Shapiro

Kim-Shapiro

Congratulations to Daniel B. Kim-Shapiro, professor of physics, whose proposal entitled “Antidote for inhaled CO poisoning based on mutationally engineered neuroglobin” has been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under award number 5R01HL125886-02 and by [subaward/subcontract from] University of Pittsburgh (WFU funding agency).

 

 

Wake Forest political science professor Wei-chin Lee in his Tribble Hall office on Monday, March 21, 2011.

Lee

Congratulations to Wei-chin Lee, professor of politics and international affairs, whose proposal entitled “International Conference and Associated Programs [Cayuse 16-0041]” has been funded by the Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office.

 

 

Rejeski

Rejeski

Congratulations to Walter J. Rejeski, professor of health and exercise science, whose proposal entitled “LookAhead Extension” has been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and by [subaward/subcontract from] Wake Forest University Health Sciences (WFU funding agency).

Proposals funded: Brubaker, Doorn-Harder, Williams

Peter Brubaker

Brubaker

Congratulations to Peter Brubaker, professor of health & exercise science, whose proposal entitled “Transition from risk factors to heart failure: Prevalence, pathogenesis, and phenomics” has been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under award number 1R01HL127028-01 and by [subaward/subcontract from] Wake Forest University Health Sciences (WFU funding agency).

 

Nelly van Doorn-Harder

Doorn-Harder

Congratulations to Nelly van Doorn-Harder, professor of Islamic studies, whose proposal entitled “Women strengthening pluralist co-existence in contemporary Indonesia: analyzing the role of Komnas Perempuan and the Koalisi Perempuan [Cayuse 16-0079]” has been funded by the University of Notre Dame.

 

 

richard.williams.150x150

Williams

Congratulations to Richard T. Williams, professor of physics, whose proposal entitled “Research on Scintillator Materials and Mechanisms: LaBr3, CeBr3 and NaI with Co-Doping [Cayuse 16-0051]” has been funded by the Saint-Gobain Ceramics & Plastics, Inc.

Gladding writes new volume in history of Wake Forest University

Sam Gladding, Chair, Department of Counseling, Wake Forest University, Tuesday, December 3, 2013.

Sam Gladding

Counseling professor Sam Gladding, whose dozens of books about counseling are read worldwide, is focused now on a topic very close to home and his heart—Wake Forest University and its history.

Recently, he completed a nine-year project to write “The History of Wake Forest University: Volume 6.”  The book tells the story of the University when it was led by Thomas K. Hearn Jr.  From 1983 until his retirement in 2005, Hearn served as Wake Forest’s 12th president.  He also was the University’s second-longest serving president with 22 years at the helm.

“Wake Forest went from a strong regional, Baptist-affiliated university to a top 30 national, independent institution of higher learning,” according to Gladding, a Wake Forest alumnus who returned to the University in 1990 as assistant to the president for special projects and professor of counseling.  He later spent several years as associate provost before focusing all of his efforts at the University on the Department of Counseling.

An opportunity to have the book signed by Gladding is ahead.  On April 9, he will be signing on campus at Words Awake 2, a two-day celebration of Wake Forest-associated writers and writing.  The signing will be held from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Benson University Center, fourth floor.  Also signing books will be Provost Emeritus Ed Wilson, author of “The History of Wake Forest University, Volume V,” which focused on the University between 1967-83, when James Ralph Scales was president.

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Thonhauser named Simons Fellow in Theoretical Physics

Timo ThonhauserTimo Thonhauser, associate professor of physics, has been named a 2016 Simons Fellow in Theoretical Physics.

Thonhauser is one of 14 university professors named by the Simons Foundation Division for Mathematics and the Physical Sciences for the fellows program that provides funds to faculty for up to a semester long research leave from classroom teaching and administrative obligations.

The announcement of this year’s fellowship recipients appeared in the March 22 “Science Times” section of the New York Times. Other recipients represent Cornell, Harvard and Columbia universities, UC Berkeley, and the University of Pennsylvania, among others.

Thonhauser is a condensed matter theorist whose research focuses on using condensed matter theory to solve currently outstanding problems in physics, biophysics, chemistry and materials science, with applications to nano-, bio- and energy-related materials.

Combined with a sabbatical from the University, Thonhauser will be on research leave for the 2016-17 academic year. He is planning to spend time at MIT to work on better understanding fundamental interactions in materials from a theoretical perspective. “With this newly gained understanding and insight, we hope to improve all kinds of materials for challenges and demands of novel devices in the 21st century – ranging from cell-phones and computers to energy production and storage.”

School of Business faculty receive awards, recognition

The following School of Business faculty have been recognized recently for their achievements:

Assistant Professor of Accounting Andrea Kelton received the Best Paper Award at the 2016 Accounting Information Systems Midyear Meeting held January 22-23. The award was for a paper she co-authored with Robin Pennington at N.C. State entitled “If you tweet, they will follow: CEO tweets, social capital and investor say-on-pay judgements.”

Assistant Professor of Accounting Norma Montague received the 2016 Innovation in Auditing and Assurance Award from the American Accounting Association. Montague and her co-author Rebecca Fay of East Carolina University received the award January 15 for a case they developed entitled “Witnessing Your Own Cognitive Bias: A Compendium of Classroom Exercises.”

Providing a rundown of the “who’s who” of the tax world, the International Tax Review’s Global Tax 50 recognizes individuals and organizations that have had a significant impact on taxation. The group named Coca-Cola Fellow and Associate Professor of Accounting Ya-wen Yang for her research. The recognition mentions her research with Assistant Professor of Accounting Andrea Kelton on the relationships between gender diversity in the boardroom and c-suite, and levels of abusive tax behavior.

Dan Locklair’s music performed at service for Justice Scalia

Professor of Music Dan Locklair’s “The Peace May Be Exchanged” for organ solo was included in the service music of the Feb. 20 funeral of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, D.C.

 The presentation of the piece may be heard at 2:13:00 into the following broadcast link – http://www.c-span.org/video/?404962-1/justice-antonin-scalia-funeral-mass&start=3196. There is also a discussion of the music used in the service at http://insanity.blogs.lchwelcome.org/2016/02/20/the-peace-may-be-exchanged/.

 “The Peace May Be Exchanged” is a movement from Locklair’s internationally performed “Rubrics,” a liturgical suite for organ. It was a 1988 commission from the Organ Artists Series of Pittsburgh, Pa., for their 10th anniversary year celebration. It has been recorded four times, including by organists Marilyn Keiser and Thomas Trotter. The piece was also part of the funeral of President Ronald Reagan. More about it is available at http://www.locklair.com/compositions/organ/rubrics-a-liturgical-suite-for-organ.  

Faculty publications: January updates

Brewer, Peter, Ray Garrison, & Eric Noreen. (Business). Introduction to Managerial Accounting, 7th ed. McGraw-Hill Education. January 2016.

Ford, James L. (Religion). The Divine Quest, East and West: A Comparative Study of Ultimate Realities. SUNY Press. January 2016.

Shi, Yaohua, Translator. (East Asian Language & Cultures). After Baptism. Renmin Wenxue (People’s Literature Press). July 2015.

Whitley, M. Stanley, & Luis González. (Romance Languages). Gramática para la composición, 3rd ed. Georgetown University Press. December 2015.