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Inside WFU

Wake Forest news for faculty and staff

Events

Wake Forest to host 5K Walk/Run for Sexual Assault Awareness

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Wake Forest is hosting a charity 5K Walk/Run for Sexual Assault Awareness on Sunday, April 26, from 1:30 to 3 p.m. Proceeds from the $15 fee will benefit Family Services Inc. Register on Davis Field. The event is sponsored by Wake Forest’s Title IX Office, Army ROTC, the Safe Office and the Women’s Center.

April is Sexual Assault Awareness month.

Campus benefit information and enrollment sessions

Campus Information and Enrollment Sessions provide opportunities to enroll for benefits at several convenient locations. Today’s April 23 event will be held at the University Corporate Center, Room 1009, from noon to 1 p.m. Upcoming sessions are scheduled at the Benson University Center, Z. Smith Reynolds Library and Farrell Hall, as well as for Reynolda House and Graylyn staff.

If you are unable to attend a face-to-face presentation, you may view an on-demand session and enroll anywhere with Internet access between now and Friday, May 1.

Faculty, staff and students invited to paint on Davis Field

unnamedWake Forest seniors Jordyn Albritton and Ariel Hawley will be laying down tarps on Davis Field and providing a variety of canvases, acrylic paints and brushes for students, faculty and staff to use to make artwork as part of “Campus Canvas.” The event will be held Thursday, April 23, from noon to 4 p.m. on Davis Field

“Campus Canvas” will provide space for members of the Wake Forest community to take a break during the school and work week for relaxation and community building.

“Jordyn and I both enjoy painting as a hobby but we lacked the time or place to engage in this type of artistic activity,” said Hawley. “We hope this event will provide a fun, creative outlet for Wake Foresters, regardless of ability.”

Campus Canvas is sponsored by Wake Forest’s ‘Thrive’ program — a campus-wide, comprehensive approach to wellbeing featuring eight branches including emotional, environmental, financial, intellectual, occupational, physical, social and spiritual. This month, Wake Forest is focusing on emotional wellbeing on campus.

Senior Showcase to highlight student work on April 21

senior-showcase-announcement-2015The 6th Annual Senior Showcase, a program that honors up to five undergraduates in their final year at Wake Forest for exemplary honors theses or projects, will be held on April 21 at 3 p.m. in the ZSR Library Auditorium.

The Showcase was founded in 2010 upon the suggestion of a former Wake Forest undergrad who was impressed by his fellow students’ research and disappointed that there was no platform for sharing their work broadly with the campus community.

Faculty advisors nominate students for the Showcase, and the nominees are reviewed by a panel of five library faculty judges. Up to five students are selected, one per division of the College. Since the program began, the library has had 53 faculty from 20 departments nominate students.

A list of the 2015 student presenters and their projects can be found here.

More information, including the criteria, links to articles about past Showcases, and a video can be found here.

Free babysitting night for children of faculty & staff

beetles.300x175Wake Forest PanHellenic is hosting a faculty and staff babysitting night in Benson University Center, Room 401 on Friday, March 20, from 5-9 p.m.for children ages 4-12. Children will be grouped by age for a fun night of games, movies and activities.

The Panhellenic Council is a board consisting of representatives from nine sororities on campus. Women from all sororities on the council will be coming together to provide a fun “night out” for children 4-12 years old. This event is to show our appreciation for faculty and staff.

There is no charge for the evening. Children must be toilet trained.

Register at: http://goo.gl/forms/9Uc6DbDnCn

Contact Arianne McArdle, vice president of civic engagement, with any questions at mcarae12@nullwfu.edu.

History of Wake Forest in three, short, lunchtime sessions

www.kizoa_.com_collage_2015-02-23_16-40-08-240x180Whether you just joined Wake Forest in the new year or you’re a seasoned Demon Deacon, it’s a great time to get more familiar with the history of Wake Forest.

From Harold Tribble’s Great Removal Program to the creation of the Scales Fine Arts Center to the rise to a top-30 national University, Wake Forest’s Professional Development Center is offering three, one-hour classes on the history of our University.

Register for all three or just one.

Classes are taught by Jenny Puckett (’71), Ed Wilson (’43) and Sam Gladding (’67, MAED ’71).

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‘Wake the Ebooks Festival’ to be held in April

wakethebooksDigital Publishing @ Wake will be hosting its inaugural Wake the Ebooks Festival on April 23-24, 2015.

The event will be held at the Z. Smith Reynolds Library.

The Festival’s mission is to serve as a too-rare confluence of authors, readers, librarians and publishers, all coming together to demonstrate the art of content creation, and the too-secret science of content curation.

The Festival’s first half-day will feature the so-called Bookfeast, where a new digital imprint, the Library Partners Press, will be officially “launched.” Throughout the Bookfeast, newly published independent authors will be reading from their selected works. Any and all interested book-lovers are invited to attend the Bookfeast, to learn about the LP Press, to hear some unique voices, and to discover (and maybe feast upon) some newly published books. Continue reading »

Office of Chaplain hosts panel discussion on Islamophobia

Chaplain Tim Auman introduces panelists Michaelle Browers, Imam Adeel Zeb, Manzoor Cheema, Jade Brooks, Dani Moore, and Khalid Griggs.

Chaplain Tim Auman introduces panelists Michaelle Browers, Imam Adeel Zeb, Manzoor Cheema, Jade Brooks, Dani Moore, and Imam Khalid Griggs.

The Office of the Chaplain recently hosted a panel discussion, “Islamophobia: The Anatomy of Difference,” aimed at creating greater interfaith understanding.

The March 2 event was held in Wait Chapel and attended by faculty, staff, students and community members.

“We want people to practice deep listening, to hear personal stories about what it means to be Muslim and what Islamophobia looks like in people’s everyday lives with the goal of opening the door for relationships that include our differences – even the subtle and the most difficult ones,” said Chaplain Tim Auman, who planned the event. In his introduction, Auman encouraged talking “constructively and compassionately about difference.”

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Tech savvy faculty and staff needed for TechXploration

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ZSR Library has students experimenting with Google Glass.

TechXploration brings together faculty and staff to showcase how technologies are being leveraged in teaching, learning, research, engagement and creative endeavors at Wake Forest. Would you be willing to share your experience at TechXploration 2015?

The event will be held Tuesday, April 7 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Benson University Center room 401.

Presenters are invited to participate for all or part of the event. Contact Kiersten Bowman, collaborative technology associate, at bowmkm0@nullwfu.edu to confirm participation by Tuesday, March 17. Information Systems will work with presenters to meet specific display needs.

Ebola symposium sheds light, shares faculty expertise

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The symposium, Ebola: At Home and Abroad, held Feb. 12-13 demonstrated the importance of a liberal arts education. Even though Ebola is a virus, attendees learned that to effectively respond to the outbreak requires knowledge of history, economics, law, bioethics, as well as biology, medicine and other disciplines. Prior to the symposium, associate teaching professor Pat Lord’s virology students studied the Ebola virus to prepare background knowledge and a quiz made available online.

On the first night of the symposium, with more than 125 undergraduate, graduate, and medical students, professors, staff, and community members present, Assistant Professor of History Nate Plageman began by challenging everyone to stop thinking of Africa as “one-dimensional.” He highlighted assumptions about race that permeated Ebola news coverage.

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